The effect of pulmonary blood flow changes on oxygen-enhanced lung magnetic resonance imaging

Hye Jeong Lee, Jaeseok Park, Jin Hur, Youngjin Kim, Ji Eun Nam, Byoung Wook Choi, Kyu Ok Choe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In this study, we investigated the effects of changes in pulmonary blood flow on oxygen-enhanced lung magnetic resonance imaging. Increased pulmonary blood flow was produced by intravenous infusion of sildenafil (0.2 mg/kg) in 10 New Zealand white rabbits. Decreased pulmonary blood flow was produced by single subcutaneous injection of monocrotaline (60 mg/kg). A velocity-encoded cine magnetic resonance imaging for pulmonary blood flow and an oxygen-enhanced lung magnetic resonance imaging were performed at baseline, during sildenafil infusion, and after monocrotaline injection. We compared the baseline data to those obtained during sildenafil infusion and after monocrotaline injection for pulmonary blood flow changes and signal intensity enhancement ratios of oxygen-enhanced lung magnetic resonance imaging. Wilcoxon's signed rank test was used for statistical analysis. There was a significant difference between pulmonary blood flow at baseline (418.6 ± 108.9 mL/min) and after sildenafil (491.9 ± 118.0 mL/min; P = 0.005) or between pulmonary blood flow at baseline and after monocrotaline administration (356.3 ± 85.8 mL/min; P = 0.017). However, there was no significant difference between the signal intensity enhancement ratios at baseline (23.8 ± 11.4%) and after sildenafil (24.0 ± 7.9%; P = 0.953) or the signal intensity enhancement ratios at baseline and after monocrotaline administration (22.7 ± 10.3%; P = 0.374). Changes in pulmonary blood flow had little effect on the signal intensity enhancement ratio of oxygen-enhanced lung magnetic resonance imaging.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1645-1649
Number of pages5
JournalMagnetic Resonance in Medicine
Volume69
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013 Jun 1

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Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Oxygen
Lung
Monocrotaline
Cine Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Injections
Subcutaneous Injections
Nonparametric Statistics
Intravenous Infusions
Sildenafil Citrate
Rabbits

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

Lee, Hye Jeong ; Park, Jaeseok ; Hur, Jin ; Kim, Youngjin ; Nam, Ji Eun ; Choi, Byoung Wook ; Choe, Kyu Ok. / The effect of pulmonary blood flow changes on oxygen-enhanced lung magnetic resonance imaging. In: Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. 2013 ; Vol. 69, No. 6. pp. 1645-1649.
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The effect of pulmonary blood flow changes on oxygen-enhanced lung magnetic resonance imaging. / Lee, Hye Jeong; Park, Jaeseok; Hur, Jin; Kim, Youngjin; Nam, Ji Eun; Choi, Byoung Wook; Choe, Kyu Ok.

In: Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, Vol. 69, No. 6, 01.06.2013, p. 1645-1649.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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