The effects and mechanism of action of methane on ileal motor function

Y. M. Park, Y. J. Lee, Z. Hussain, Y. H. Lee, HyoJin Park

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Methane has been associated with constipation-predominant irritable bowel syndrome, slowing intestinal transit time by augmenting contractile activity. However, the precise mechanism underlying this effect remains unclear. Therefore, we investigated the mechanisms underlying the effect of methane on contractile activity, and whether such effects are mediated by nerve impulses or muscular contraction. Methods: We connected guinea pig ileal muscle strips to a force/tension transducer and measured amplitudes of contraction in response to electrical field stimulation (EFS; 1, 2, 8, 16 Hz) following methane infusion in the presence of tetradotoxin (TTX), atropine, guanethidine, or GR 113808. We then performed calcium imaging using Oregon Green 488 BAPTA-1 AM in order to visualize changes in calcium fluorescence in response to EFS following methane infusion in the presence of TTX, atropine, or a high K + solution. Key Results: Methane significantly increased amplitudes of contraction (P<.05), while treatment with TTX abolished such contraction. Methane-induced increases in amplitude were inhibited when lower-frequency (1, 2 Hz) EFS was applied following atropine infusion (P<.05). Neither guanethidine nor GR 113808 significantly altered contraction amplitudes. Methane significantly increased calcium fluorescence, while this increase was attenuated following atropine infusion (P<.05). Although calcium fluorescence was increased by the high K + solution under pretreatment with TTX, the intensity of fluorescence remained unchanged after methane infusion. Conclusions and Inferences: The actions of methane on the intestine are influenced by the cholinergic pathway of the enteric nervous system. Our findings support the classification of methane as a gasotransmitter.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere13077
JournalNeurogastroenterology and Motility
Volume29
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017 Sep 1

Fingerprint

Methane
Tetrodotoxin
Atropine
Fluorescence
Calcium
Guanethidine
Gasotransmitters
Enteric Nervous System
Irritable Bowel Syndrome
Constipation
Muscle Contraction
Transducers
Cholinergic Agents
Electric Stimulation
Action Potentials
Intestines
Guinea Pigs
Muscles

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Physiology
  • Endocrine and Autonomic Systems
  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Park, Y. M. ; Lee, Y. J. ; Hussain, Z. ; Lee, Y. H. ; Park, HyoJin. / The effects and mechanism of action of methane on ileal motor function. In: Neurogastroenterology and Motility. 2017 ; Vol. 29, No. 9.
@article{19707f97ef054a278245fc0dd1f1b93c,
title = "The effects and mechanism of action of methane on ileal motor function",
abstract = "Background: Methane has been associated with constipation-predominant irritable bowel syndrome, slowing intestinal transit time by augmenting contractile activity. However, the precise mechanism underlying this effect remains unclear. Therefore, we investigated the mechanisms underlying the effect of methane on contractile activity, and whether such effects are mediated by nerve impulses or muscular contraction. Methods: We connected guinea pig ileal muscle strips to a force/tension transducer and measured amplitudes of contraction in response to electrical field stimulation (EFS; 1, 2, 8, 16 Hz) following methane infusion in the presence of tetradotoxin (TTX), atropine, guanethidine, or GR 113808. We then performed calcium imaging using Oregon Green 488 BAPTA-1 AM in order to visualize changes in calcium fluorescence in response to EFS following methane infusion in the presence of TTX, atropine, or a high K + solution. Key Results: Methane significantly increased amplitudes of contraction (P<.05), while treatment with TTX abolished such contraction. Methane-induced increases in amplitude were inhibited when lower-frequency (1, 2 Hz) EFS was applied following atropine infusion (P<.05). Neither guanethidine nor GR 113808 significantly altered contraction amplitudes. Methane significantly increased calcium fluorescence, while this increase was attenuated following atropine infusion (P<.05). Although calcium fluorescence was increased by the high K + solution under pretreatment with TTX, the intensity of fluorescence remained unchanged after methane infusion. Conclusions and Inferences: The actions of methane on the intestine are influenced by the cholinergic pathway of the enteric nervous system. Our findings support the classification of methane as a gasotransmitter.",
author = "Park, {Y. M.} and Lee, {Y. J.} and Z. Hussain and Lee, {Y. H.} and HyoJin Park",
year = "2017",
month = "9",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/nmo.13077",
language = "English",
volume = "29",
journal = "Neurogastroenterology and Motility",
issn = "1350-1925",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "9",

}

The effects and mechanism of action of methane on ileal motor function. / Park, Y. M.; Lee, Y. J.; Hussain, Z.; Lee, Y. H.; Park, HyoJin.

In: Neurogastroenterology and Motility, Vol. 29, No. 9, e13077, 01.09.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - The effects and mechanism of action of methane on ileal motor function

AU - Park, Y. M.

AU - Lee, Y. J.

AU - Hussain, Z.

AU - Lee, Y. H.

AU - Park, HyoJin

PY - 2017/9/1

Y1 - 2017/9/1

N2 - Background: Methane has been associated with constipation-predominant irritable bowel syndrome, slowing intestinal transit time by augmenting contractile activity. However, the precise mechanism underlying this effect remains unclear. Therefore, we investigated the mechanisms underlying the effect of methane on contractile activity, and whether such effects are mediated by nerve impulses or muscular contraction. Methods: We connected guinea pig ileal muscle strips to a force/tension transducer and measured amplitudes of contraction in response to electrical field stimulation (EFS; 1, 2, 8, 16 Hz) following methane infusion in the presence of tetradotoxin (TTX), atropine, guanethidine, or GR 113808. We then performed calcium imaging using Oregon Green 488 BAPTA-1 AM in order to visualize changes in calcium fluorescence in response to EFS following methane infusion in the presence of TTX, atropine, or a high K + solution. Key Results: Methane significantly increased amplitudes of contraction (P<.05), while treatment with TTX abolished such contraction. Methane-induced increases in amplitude were inhibited when lower-frequency (1, 2 Hz) EFS was applied following atropine infusion (P<.05). Neither guanethidine nor GR 113808 significantly altered contraction amplitudes. Methane significantly increased calcium fluorescence, while this increase was attenuated following atropine infusion (P<.05). Although calcium fluorescence was increased by the high K + solution under pretreatment with TTX, the intensity of fluorescence remained unchanged after methane infusion. Conclusions and Inferences: The actions of methane on the intestine are influenced by the cholinergic pathway of the enteric nervous system. Our findings support the classification of methane as a gasotransmitter.

AB - Background: Methane has been associated with constipation-predominant irritable bowel syndrome, slowing intestinal transit time by augmenting contractile activity. However, the precise mechanism underlying this effect remains unclear. Therefore, we investigated the mechanisms underlying the effect of methane on contractile activity, and whether such effects are mediated by nerve impulses or muscular contraction. Methods: We connected guinea pig ileal muscle strips to a force/tension transducer and measured amplitudes of contraction in response to electrical field stimulation (EFS; 1, 2, 8, 16 Hz) following methane infusion in the presence of tetradotoxin (TTX), atropine, guanethidine, or GR 113808. We then performed calcium imaging using Oregon Green 488 BAPTA-1 AM in order to visualize changes in calcium fluorescence in response to EFS following methane infusion in the presence of TTX, atropine, or a high K + solution. Key Results: Methane significantly increased amplitudes of contraction (P<.05), while treatment with TTX abolished such contraction. Methane-induced increases in amplitude were inhibited when lower-frequency (1, 2 Hz) EFS was applied following atropine infusion (P<.05). Neither guanethidine nor GR 113808 significantly altered contraction amplitudes. Methane significantly increased calcium fluorescence, while this increase was attenuated following atropine infusion (P<.05). Although calcium fluorescence was increased by the high K + solution under pretreatment with TTX, the intensity of fluorescence remained unchanged after methane infusion. Conclusions and Inferences: The actions of methane on the intestine are influenced by the cholinergic pathway of the enteric nervous system. Our findings support the classification of methane as a gasotransmitter.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85018613814&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85018613814&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/nmo.13077

DO - 10.1111/nmo.13077

M3 - Article

VL - 29

JO - Neurogastroenterology and Motility

JF - Neurogastroenterology and Motility

SN - 1350-1925

IS - 9

M1 - e13077

ER -