The effects of diet alone or in combination with exercise in patients with prehypertension and hypertension

A randomized controlled trial

Chan Joo Lee, Ji Young Kim, Eugene Shim, Sung Hyun Hong, Mi Kyung Lee, Justin Y. Jeon, Sungha Park

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background and Objectives: Supervised lifestyle interventions, including dietary and exercise programs, may be infeasible to implement in real-world settings. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of a home-based lifestyle modification intervention on blood pressure (BP) management. Methods: Eighty-five patients aged over 20 years and diagnosed with prehypertension or mild hypertension were randomly assigned to an advice-only comparison group (C group, n=28), a Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet education group (D group, n=30), or a DASH and home-based exercise group (D+Ex group, n=27). The intervention lasted for 8 weeks. The primary outcome was the difference in office systolic blood pressure (SBP) before and after the study period (Trial registry at ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT01637909). Results: Seventy-two participants (87.8%) completed the trial. The degree of change in office SBP did not significantly differ among the intervention groups; however, the D+Ex group demonstrated a tendency toward decreased SBP. Upon analysis of 24-hour ambulatory BP measurements, daytime ambulatory SBP was significantly lower in the D+Ex group (134 mmHg; 95% confidence interval [CI], 131 to 137; p=0.011) than in the C group (139.5 mmHg; 95% CI, 130.9 to 137), and daytime ambulatory SBP was significantly decreased in the D+Ex group (?5.2 mmHg; 95% CI, ?8.3 to ?2.1; p=0.011) compared to the C group (0.4 mmHg, 95% CI, ?2.5 to 3.3). Conclusions: In conclusion, lifestyle modification emphasizing both diet and exercise was effective for lowering BP and should be favored over diet-only modifications.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)637-651
Number of pages15
JournalKorean Circulation Journal
Volume48
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018 Jul 1

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Prehypertension
Randomized Controlled Trials
Exercise
Diet
Blood Pressure
Hypertension
Confidence Intervals
Life Style
Diet Therapy

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Internal Medicine
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

@article{4f1324b3665148b88d6ee59a1fbc5b5b,
title = "The effects of diet alone or in combination with exercise in patients with prehypertension and hypertension: A randomized controlled trial",
abstract = "Background and Objectives: Supervised lifestyle interventions, including dietary and exercise programs, may be infeasible to implement in real-world settings. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of a home-based lifestyle modification intervention on blood pressure (BP) management. Methods: Eighty-five patients aged over 20 years and diagnosed with prehypertension or mild hypertension were randomly assigned to an advice-only comparison group (C group, n=28), a Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet education group (D group, n=30), or a DASH and home-based exercise group (D+Ex group, n=27). The intervention lasted for 8 weeks. The primary outcome was the difference in office systolic blood pressure (SBP) before and after the study period (Trial registry at ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT01637909). Results: Seventy-two participants (87.8{\%}) completed the trial. The degree of change in office SBP did not significantly differ among the intervention groups; however, the D+Ex group demonstrated a tendency toward decreased SBP. Upon analysis of 24-hour ambulatory BP measurements, daytime ambulatory SBP was significantly lower in the D+Ex group (134 mmHg; 95{\%} confidence interval [CI], 131 to 137; p=0.011) than in the C group (139.5 mmHg; 95{\%} CI, 130.9 to 137), and daytime ambulatory SBP was significantly decreased in the D+Ex group (?5.2 mmHg; 95{\%} CI, ?8.3 to ?2.1; p=0.011) compared to the C group (0.4 mmHg, 95{\%} CI, ?2.5 to 3.3). Conclusions: In conclusion, lifestyle modification emphasizing both diet and exercise was effective for lowering BP and should be favored over diet-only modifications.",
author = "Lee, {Chan Joo} and Kim, {Ji Young} and Eugene Shim and Hong, {Sung Hyun} and Lee, {Mi Kyung} and Jeon, {Justin Y.} and Sungha Park",
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The effects of diet alone or in combination with exercise in patients with prehypertension and hypertension : A randomized controlled trial. / Lee, Chan Joo; Kim, Ji Young; Shim, Eugene; Hong, Sung Hyun; Lee, Mi Kyung; Jeon, Justin Y.; Park, Sungha.

In: Korean Circulation Journal, Vol. 48, No. 7, 01.07.2018, p. 637-651.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - The effects of diet alone or in combination with exercise in patients with prehypertension and hypertension

T2 - A randomized controlled trial

AU - Lee, Chan Joo

AU - Kim, Ji Young

AU - Shim, Eugene

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AU - Lee, Mi Kyung

AU - Jeon, Justin Y.

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