The effects of electronic supply chain design (e-SCD) on coordination and knowledge sharing: An empirical investigation

Ki Chan Kim, Il Im

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Customization is a critical success factor in the current business environment. One of the most important components that makes fast and inexpensive customization possible is electronic supply chain design (e-SCD). e-SCD is a supply chain design which integrates and coordinates suppliers, manufacturers, logistic channels, and customers using information technology (IT). In this study, a model that shows the effects of e-SCD on the customization capability of companies is developed. From previous studies, the model identifies three major effects of e-SCD-electronic linkage, supply chain coordination, and co-engineering. The model also shows a process through which an electronic supply chain network is transformed from a simple infrastructure for data exchange into a knowledge-sharing network for fast response and customization. The model is tested using data collected from the automobile industry in Korea. The results show that e-SCD has significant effects on supply chain coordination and co-engineering. This implies that e-SCD can be an effective management tool to deliver customized products with right timing and price. It is also shown that the 'involvement' of entities in a supply chain is a critical factor in converting a supply chain network from an infrastructure for data exchange to a knowledge-sharing network.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 35th Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, HICSS 2002
EditorsRalph H. Sprague
PublisherIEEE Computer Society
Pages2149-2158
Number of pages10
ISBN (Electronic)0769514359
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2002 Jan 1
Event35th Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, HICSS 2002 - Big Island, United States
Duration: 2002 Jan 72002 Jan 10

Publication series

NameProceedings of the Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences
Volume2002-January
ISSN (Print)1530-1605

Other

Other35th Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, HICSS 2002
CountryUnited States
CityBig Island
Period02/1/702/1/10

Fingerprint

Supply chains
Electronic data interchange
Automotive industry
Information technology
Logistics
Industry

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

Kim, K. C., & Im, I. (2002). The effects of electronic supply chain design (e-SCD) on coordination and knowledge sharing: An empirical investigation. In R. H. Sprague (Ed.), Proceedings of the 35th Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, HICSS 2002 (pp. 2149-2158). [994144] (Proceedings of the Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences; Vol. 2002-January). IEEE Computer Society. https://doi.org/10.1109/HICSS.2002.994144
Kim, Ki Chan ; Im, Il. / The effects of electronic supply chain design (e-SCD) on coordination and knowledge sharing : An empirical investigation. Proceedings of the 35th Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, HICSS 2002. editor / Ralph H. Sprague. IEEE Computer Society, 2002. pp. 2149-2158 (Proceedings of the Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences).
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Kim, KC & Im, I 2002, The effects of electronic supply chain design (e-SCD) on coordination and knowledge sharing: An empirical investigation. in RH Sprague (ed.), Proceedings of the 35th Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, HICSS 2002., 994144, Proceedings of the Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, vol. 2002-January, IEEE Computer Society, pp. 2149-2158, 35th Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, HICSS 2002, Big Island, United States, 02/1/7. https://doi.org/10.1109/HICSS.2002.994144

The effects of electronic supply chain design (e-SCD) on coordination and knowledge sharing : An empirical investigation. / Kim, Ki Chan; Im, Il.

Proceedings of the 35th Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, HICSS 2002. ed. / Ralph H. Sprague. IEEE Computer Society, 2002. p. 2149-2158 994144 (Proceedings of the Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences; Vol. 2002-January).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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Kim KC, Im I. The effects of electronic supply chain design (e-SCD) on coordination and knowledge sharing: An empirical investigation. In Sprague RH, editor, Proceedings of the 35th Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, HICSS 2002. IEEE Computer Society. 2002. p. 2149-2158. 994144. (Proceedings of the Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences). https://doi.org/10.1109/HICSS.2002.994144