The effects of testosterone on skin barrier

Hana Bak, Eung Ho Choi, Kwang Gil Lee, Seung Phil Hong, Seung Hun Lee, Sung Ku Ahn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Background: Although there are no known gender-related differences in permeability barrier function in adults, estrogen accelerates whereas testosterone retards barrier develop-ment in fetal skin. However, there have been few studies concerning the effects of testosterone on the skin barrier. Object: We evaluated the effects and mechanisms of testosterone on the skin barrier. Methods: In this experiment, hairless mice were divided into three groups; sham-operated, castrated and testosterone-replacement castrated group. Testosterone was administered subcutaneously once a day for 7 days. We performed a skin biopsy at 7 days and performed hematoxyline-eosin staining, calcium-ion capture cytometry and the immunohistochemical examination of involucrin, loricrin, filaggrin and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). The specimens were prepared for electron microscopy using RuO4 and OsO4 postfixation. Results: The results were summarized as follows 1. Light microscopic findings of the testosterone-replacement castrated group showed apparent hyperkeratosis and acanthosis, not present in the sham-operated and castrated group. 2. Whereas the expression of involucrin, loricrin and filaggrin of immunohistochemical staining and in situ hybridization of the sham-operated and castrated group were normal, it was abnormal in the testosterone-replacement castrated group. 3. Labelling indices for PCNA in the sham-operated and castrated group were not statistically different, but the testosterone- replacement castrated group showed a marked increase of PCNA labeling index. 4. Wherease the calcium gradient was normal in the sham-operated and castrated group, it was distorted in the testosterone-replacement castrated group. Calcium deposition was increased through all layers of the epidermis and the calcium gradient disappeared in the testosterone-replacement castrated group. 5. Normal looking membrane structure was observed in the sham-operated and castrated group, but a membrane structure which appeared fragmented, incomplete lipid bilayer structures and prominent dilatation of lacunar domains were observed only in the testosterone-replacement castrated group. Conclusion: From the above results, it is concluded that there is a functional alteration of the epidermal barrier induced by testosterone, including the formation of an abnormal cornified envelope and also incomplete lipid synthesis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)167-176
Number of pages10
JournalKorean Journal of Dermatology
Volume43
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 2005 Feb 1

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Testosterone
Skin
Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen
Calcium
Staining and Labeling
Hairless Mouse
Membranes
Lipid Bilayers
Eosine Yellowish-(YS)
Epidermis
In Situ Hybridization
Dilatation
Permeability
Electron Microscopy
Estrogens
Ions
Lipids
Biopsy
Light

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Dermatology

Cite this

Bak, H., Choi, E. H., Lee, K. G., Hong, S. P., Lee, S. H., & Ahn, S. K. (2005). The effects of testosterone on skin barrier. Korean Journal of Dermatology, 43(2), 167-176.
Bak, Hana ; Choi, Eung Ho ; Lee, Kwang Gil ; Hong, Seung Phil ; Lee, Seung Hun ; Ahn, Sung Ku. / The effects of testosterone on skin barrier. In: Korean Journal of Dermatology. 2005 ; Vol. 43, No. 2. pp. 167-176.
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abstract = "Background: Although there are no known gender-related differences in permeability barrier function in adults, estrogen accelerates whereas testosterone retards barrier develop-ment in fetal skin. However, there have been few studies concerning the effects of testosterone on the skin barrier. Object: We evaluated the effects and mechanisms of testosterone on the skin barrier. Methods: In this experiment, hairless mice were divided into three groups; sham-operated, castrated and testosterone-replacement castrated group. Testosterone was administered subcutaneously once a day for 7 days. We performed a skin biopsy at 7 days and performed hematoxyline-eosin staining, calcium-ion capture cytometry and the immunohistochemical examination of involucrin, loricrin, filaggrin and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). The specimens were prepared for electron microscopy using RuO4 and OsO4 postfixation. Results: The results were summarized as follows 1. Light microscopic findings of the testosterone-replacement castrated group showed apparent hyperkeratosis and acanthosis, not present in the sham-operated and castrated group. 2. Whereas the expression of involucrin, loricrin and filaggrin of immunohistochemical staining and in situ hybridization of the sham-operated and castrated group were normal, it was abnormal in the testosterone-replacement castrated group. 3. Labelling indices for PCNA in the sham-operated and castrated group were not statistically different, but the testosterone- replacement castrated group showed a marked increase of PCNA labeling index. 4. Wherease the calcium gradient was normal in the sham-operated and castrated group, it was distorted in the testosterone-replacement castrated group. Calcium deposition was increased through all layers of the epidermis and the calcium gradient disappeared in the testosterone-replacement castrated group. 5. Normal looking membrane structure was observed in the sham-operated and castrated group, but a membrane structure which appeared fragmented, incomplete lipid bilayer structures and prominent dilatation of lacunar domains were observed only in the testosterone-replacement castrated group. Conclusion: From the above results, it is concluded that there is a functional alteration of the epidermal barrier induced by testosterone, including the formation of an abnormal cornified envelope and also incomplete lipid synthesis.",
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Bak, H, Choi, EH, Lee, KG, Hong, SP, Lee, SH & Ahn, SK 2005, 'The effects of testosterone on skin barrier', Korean Journal of Dermatology, vol. 43, no. 2, pp. 167-176.

The effects of testosterone on skin barrier. / Bak, Hana; Choi, Eung Ho; Lee, Kwang Gil; Hong, Seung Phil; Lee, Seung Hun; Ahn, Sung Ku.

In: Korean Journal of Dermatology, Vol. 43, No. 2, 01.02.2005, p. 167-176.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - The effects of testosterone on skin barrier

AU - Bak, Hana

AU - Choi, Eung Ho

AU - Lee, Kwang Gil

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AU - Lee, Seung Hun

AU - Ahn, Sung Ku

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N2 - Background: Although there are no known gender-related differences in permeability barrier function in adults, estrogen accelerates whereas testosterone retards barrier develop-ment in fetal skin. However, there have been few studies concerning the effects of testosterone on the skin barrier. Object: We evaluated the effects and mechanisms of testosterone on the skin barrier. Methods: In this experiment, hairless mice were divided into three groups; sham-operated, castrated and testosterone-replacement castrated group. Testosterone was administered subcutaneously once a day for 7 days. We performed a skin biopsy at 7 days and performed hematoxyline-eosin staining, calcium-ion capture cytometry and the immunohistochemical examination of involucrin, loricrin, filaggrin and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). The specimens were prepared for electron microscopy using RuO4 and OsO4 postfixation. Results: The results were summarized as follows 1. Light microscopic findings of the testosterone-replacement castrated group showed apparent hyperkeratosis and acanthosis, not present in the sham-operated and castrated group. 2. Whereas the expression of involucrin, loricrin and filaggrin of immunohistochemical staining and in situ hybridization of the sham-operated and castrated group were normal, it was abnormal in the testosterone-replacement castrated group. 3. Labelling indices for PCNA in the sham-operated and castrated group were not statistically different, but the testosterone- replacement castrated group showed a marked increase of PCNA labeling index. 4. Wherease the calcium gradient was normal in the sham-operated and castrated group, it was distorted in the testosterone-replacement castrated group. Calcium deposition was increased through all layers of the epidermis and the calcium gradient disappeared in the testosterone-replacement castrated group. 5. Normal looking membrane structure was observed in the sham-operated and castrated group, but a membrane structure which appeared fragmented, incomplete lipid bilayer structures and prominent dilatation of lacunar domains were observed only in the testosterone-replacement castrated group. Conclusion: From the above results, it is concluded that there is a functional alteration of the epidermal barrier induced by testosterone, including the formation of an abnormal cornified envelope and also incomplete lipid synthesis.

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Bak H, Choi EH, Lee KG, Hong SP, Lee SH, Ahn SK. The effects of testosterone on skin barrier. Korean Journal of Dermatology. 2005 Feb 1;43(2):167-176.