The impact of design representation on visual perception: Comparing eye-tracking data of architectural scenes between photography and line drawing

Jaewan Park, Yan Jin, Sihyeong Ahn, Sangwon Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background Representation in architecture is essential in that most of the design process is performed in representing media. Previous visualization studies have used questionnaires to reveal the relationship between the credibility of representation and high-level features (e.g., accuracy, realism, and abstraction) but had limited impact on the understanding of how people perceive and should produce representations. Methods In this study, eye-tracking data from six pairs of photographs and line drawing images were used to understand how representations affect people's perceptions of architectural scenes. The impact of the educational background of the viewer and the sensitivity to a change in the given architectural scene was also investigated. Results Line drawing, relative to photography, was found to scatter and concentrate attention depending on the means of expression, to reduce the difference in attention between major/non-major groups, and to lessen the shift in attention according to scene changes because of the reduced contextual information. Conclusions While this study suggests how representational differences may be alleviated through technical means, we also argue that line drawing has a unique potential as a common cognitive ground for more open discussion.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)5-29
Number of pages25
JournalArchives of Design Research
Volume32
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019 Jan 1

Fingerprint

Drawing (graphics)
Photography
Visualization
Line Drawing
Visual Perception

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Architecture
  • Visual Arts and Performing Arts
  • Computer Graphics and Computer-Aided Design

Cite this

@article{c4716c1664074f62a2b4678cab8f6d48,
title = "The impact of design representation on visual perception: Comparing eye-tracking data of architectural scenes between photography and line drawing",
abstract = "Background Representation in architecture is essential in that most of the design process is performed in representing media. Previous visualization studies have used questionnaires to reveal the relationship between the credibility of representation and high-level features (e.g., accuracy, realism, and abstraction) but had limited impact on the understanding of how people perceive and should produce representations. Methods In this study, eye-tracking data from six pairs of photographs and line drawing images were used to understand how representations affect people's perceptions of architectural scenes. The impact of the educational background of the viewer and the sensitivity to a change in the given architectural scene was also investigated. Results Line drawing, relative to photography, was found to scatter and concentrate attention depending on the means of expression, to reduce the difference in attention between major/non-major groups, and to lessen the shift in attention according to scene changes because of the reduced contextual information. Conclusions While this study suggests how representational differences may be alleviated through technical means, we also argue that line drawing has a unique potential as a common cognitive ground for more open discussion.",
author = "Jaewan Park and Yan Jin and Sihyeong Ahn and Sangwon Lee",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.15187/ADR.2019.02.32.1.5",
language = "English",
volume = "32",
pages = "5--29",
journal = "Archives of Design Research",
issn = "1226-8046",
publisher = "Korean Society of Design Science",
number = "1",

}

The impact of design representation on visual perception : Comparing eye-tracking data of architectural scenes between photography and line drawing. / Park, Jaewan; Jin, Yan; Ahn, Sihyeong; Lee, Sangwon.

In: Archives of Design Research, Vol. 32, No. 1, 01.01.2019, p. 5-29.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - The impact of design representation on visual perception

T2 - Comparing eye-tracking data of architectural scenes between photography and line drawing

AU - Park, Jaewan

AU - Jin, Yan

AU - Ahn, Sihyeong

AU - Lee, Sangwon

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - Background Representation in architecture is essential in that most of the design process is performed in representing media. Previous visualization studies have used questionnaires to reveal the relationship between the credibility of representation and high-level features (e.g., accuracy, realism, and abstraction) but had limited impact on the understanding of how people perceive and should produce representations. Methods In this study, eye-tracking data from six pairs of photographs and line drawing images were used to understand how representations affect people's perceptions of architectural scenes. The impact of the educational background of the viewer and the sensitivity to a change in the given architectural scene was also investigated. Results Line drawing, relative to photography, was found to scatter and concentrate attention depending on the means of expression, to reduce the difference in attention between major/non-major groups, and to lessen the shift in attention according to scene changes because of the reduced contextual information. Conclusions While this study suggests how representational differences may be alleviated through technical means, we also argue that line drawing has a unique potential as a common cognitive ground for more open discussion.

AB - Background Representation in architecture is essential in that most of the design process is performed in representing media. Previous visualization studies have used questionnaires to reveal the relationship between the credibility of representation and high-level features (e.g., accuracy, realism, and abstraction) but had limited impact on the understanding of how people perceive and should produce representations. Methods In this study, eye-tracking data from six pairs of photographs and line drawing images were used to understand how representations affect people's perceptions of architectural scenes. The impact of the educational background of the viewer and the sensitivity to a change in the given architectural scene was also investigated. Results Line drawing, relative to photography, was found to scatter and concentrate attention depending on the means of expression, to reduce the difference in attention between major/non-major groups, and to lessen the shift in attention according to scene changes because of the reduced contextual information. Conclusions While this study suggests how representational differences may be alleviated through technical means, we also argue that line drawing has a unique potential as a common cognitive ground for more open discussion.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85071543875&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85071543875&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.15187/ADR.2019.02.32.1.5

DO - 10.15187/ADR.2019.02.32.1.5

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85071543875

VL - 32

SP - 5

EP - 29

JO - Archives of Design Research

JF - Archives of Design Research

SN - 1226-8046

IS - 1

ER -