The impact of living arrangements on quality of life among Korean elderly: findings from the Korean Longitudinal Study of Aging (2006–2012)

Juyeong Kim, Young Choi, Sohee Park, Kyoung Hee Cho, Yeong Jun Ju, Euncheol Park

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: To investigate the impact of different living arrangements on quality of life (QoL) and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in the elderly. Methods: We used data from the first to fourth wave of the Korean Longitudinal Study of Aging. Using the first wave as a baseline, the data included 5050 individuals aged 60 years and older with at least one living child. QoL and HRQoL were measured using a visual analogue scale developed by the Korean Labor Institute that bears similarity to the EQ-VAS. Living arrangements were categorized based on household composition (single household, one-generation household, two-generation household, and three-generation household) and the marital status of a cohabiting adult child. A generalized estimating equation was used to examine the association between living arrangements and QoL/HRQoL. Results: Compared to elderly individuals living in three-generation families with a married child, those in a single household (QoL: β = −2.67 [P = 0.001]; HRQoL: β = −2.24 [P = 0.007]), those living in a three-generation family with an unmarried adult child (QoL: β = −5.19 [P < 0.0001]; HRQoL: β = −3.41 [P < 0.0001]), and those living in a two-generation family with an unmarried adult child (QoL: β = −2.88 [P < 0.0001]; HRQoL: β = −2.80 [P < 0.0001]) were more likely to have lower QoL and HRQoL. These associations were particularly strong for women and individuals in the lowest equivalent household income group. Conclusion: It is necessary to devise government programs not only for elderly individuals living alone, but also for those living with an unmarried adult child; elderly persons who are female and part of the lowest equivalent household income group must receive particular attention.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1303-1314
Number of pages12
JournalQuality of Life Research
Volume26
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017 May 1

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Longitudinal Studies
Quality of Life
Adult Children
Government Programs
Marital Status
Visual Analog Scale

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Kim, Juyeong ; Choi, Young ; Park, Sohee ; Cho, Kyoung Hee ; Ju, Yeong Jun ; Park, Euncheol. / The impact of living arrangements on quality of life among Korean elderly : findings from the Korean Longitudinal Study of Aging (2006–2012). In: Quality of Life Research. 2017 ; Vol. 26, No. 5. pp. 1303-1314.
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abstract = "Purpose: To investigate the impact of different living arrangements on quality of life (QoL) and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in the elderly. Methods: We used data from the first to fourth wave of the Korean Longitudinal Study of Aging. Using the first wave as a baseline, the data included 5050 individuals aged 60 years and older with at least one living child. QoL and HRQoL were measured using a visual analogue scale developed by the Korean Labor Institute that bears similarity to the EQ-VAS. Living arrangements were categorized based on household composition (single household, one-generation household, two-generation household, and three-generation household) and the marital status of a cohabiting adult child. A generalized estimating equation was used to examine the association between living arrangements and QoL/HRQoL. Results: Compared to elderly individuals living in three-generation families with a married child, those in a single household (QoL: β = −2.67 [P = 0.001]; HRQoL: β = −2.24 [P = 0.007]), those living in a three-generation family with an unmarried adult child (QoL: β = −5.19 [P < 0.0001]; HRQoL: β = −3.41 [P < 0.0001]), and those living in a two-generation family with an unmarried adult child (QoL: β = −2.88 [P < 0.0001]; HRQoL: β = −2.80 [P < 0.0001]) were more likely to have lower QoL and HRQoL. These associations were particularly strong for women and individuals in the lowest equivalent household income group. Conclusion: It is necessary to devise government programs not only for elderly individuals living alone, but also for those living with an unmarried adult child; elderly persons who are female and part of the lowest equivalent household income group must receive particular attention.",
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The impact of living arrangements on quality of life among Korean elderly : findings from the Korean Longitudinal Study of Aging (2006–2012). / Kim, Juyeong; Choi, Young; Park, Sohee; Cho, Kyoung Hee; Ju, Yeong Jun; Park, Euncheol.

In: Quality of Life Research, Vol. 26, No. 5, 01.05.2017, p. 1303-1314.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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