The impact of medication adherence on health outcomes for chronic metabolic diseases: A retrospective cohort study

Euna Han, Dong Churl Suh, Seung Mi Lee, Sunmee Jang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

36 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Hypertension, diabetes, and hyperlipidemia have a large influence on health outcomes dueto their chronic nature and serious complications. Medication is a key factor in preventing diseaseadvancement, and it is important to assess whether good medication adherence has any potential long-term impact on health outcomes and provides an international validation on the relationship. Objectives: To evaluate the impact of good medication adherence on health outcomes of complications and hospitalizations for hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and diabetes. Methods: Patients who had had outpatient pharmacy claims for drugs for hypertension, diabetes, or hyperlipidemia were separately identified from the Korean National Health Insurance Claims Database in year 2009. A 10% random sample was respectively drawn from the three disease groups, and all claims from years 2008-2011 were extracted for the sampled subjects. Medication adherence was measured by the medication possession ratio (MPR) during the 12-month after the index date, the initial date from when medication was counted, with poor adherence as <80% of MPR. Health outcomes were measured both at 2 and 3 years after the index date as any occurrence of disease-related complications, disease-specific hospitalizations, and all-cause hospitalizations. Results: Poor medication adherence was associated with a higher occurrence of disease-specific hospitalizations for hypertension patients (+10.9%, only at 2 years). The likelihood of all-cause hospitalization was higher among patients who had poor medication adherence in hypertension (+32% and +29% at 2 and 3 years), hyperlipidemia (+16% and +14% at 2 and 3 years), and diabetes (+32% and +29% at 2 and 3 years). Poor medication adherence also increased the likelihood of complications for hypertension (+14% and +7% at 2 and 3 years) and hyperlipidemia patients (+8.1% at 2 years). Conclusions: Targeting good medication adherence could be a valuable policy strategy to effectively manage chronic diseases to improve health outcomes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)e87-e98
JournalResearch in Social and Administrative Pharmacy
Volume10
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
We gratefully acknowledge research support from the Korea Association of Pharmacy Education . Han also acknowledges research support from the Korea National Research Foundation ( NRF-2012007096 ). Data support from Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service is appreciated. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official view of the Korea Association of Pharmacy Education or the Korea National Research Foundation.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2014 Elsevier Inc.

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pharmacy
  • Pharmaceutical Science

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