The interaction between neighborhood disadvantage and genetic factors in the prediction of antisocial outcomes

Kevin M. Beaver, Chris L. Gibson, Matt DeLisi, Michael George Vaughn, John Paul Wright

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective. There is growing recognition that antisocial behaviors are produced by a combination of environmental and genetic factors. Research has revealed that environmental and genetic factors work interactively and often moderate the effects of the other. Method. We test for gene-environment interactions in the current study by examining whether neighborhood disadvantage interacts with two dopamine receptor genes (DRD2 and DRD4) to predict three different antisocial measures: adolescent victimization, contact with delinquent peers, and involvement in violent delinquency. Results. Analysis of male respondents drawn from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health revealed that the association between the two dopamine genes and the measures of antisocial outcomes tended to be stronger in disadvantaged neighborhoods. Conclusions. Antisocial outcomes appear to be affected by gene-environment interactions between dopaminergic genes and neighborhood disadvantage.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)25-40
Number of pages16
JournalYouth Violence and Juvenile Justice
Volume10
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012 Jan 1

Fingerprint

heredity
Gene-Environment Interaction
environmental factors
interaction
National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health
Genes
adolescent
Crime Victims
Dopamine Receptors
Vulnerable Populations
delinquency
victimization
Dopamine
longitudinal study
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
contact
health
Research

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health(social science)
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Law

Cite this

Beaver, Kevin M. ; Gibson, Chris L. ; DeLisi, Matt ; Vaughn, Michael George ; Wright, John Paul. / The interaction between neighborhood disadvantage and genetic factors in the prediction of antisocial outcomes. In: Youth Violence and Juvenile Justice. 2012 ; Vol. 10, No. 1. pp. 25-40.
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The interaction between neighborhood disadvantage and genetic factors in the prediction of antisocial outcomes. / Beaver, Kevin M.; Gibson, Chris L.; DeLisi, Matt; Vaughn, Michael George; Wright, John Paul.

In: Youth Violence and Juvenile Justice, Vol. 10, No. 1, 01.01.2012, p. 25-40.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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