The JEM-EUSO mission: An introduction

The JEM-EUSO Collaboration

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The Extreme Universe Space Observatory on board the Japanese Experiment Module of the International Space Station, JEM-EUSO, is being designed to search from space ultra-high energy cosmic rays. These are charged particles with energies from a few 1019 eV to beyond 1020 eV, at the very end of the known cosmic ray energy spectrum. JEM-EUSO will also search for extreme energy neutrinos, photons, and exotic particles, providing a unique opportunity to explore largely unknown phenomena in our Universe. The mission, principally based on a wide field of view (60 degrees) near-UV telescope with a diameter of ∼ 2.5 m, will monitor the earth’s atmosphere at night, pioneering the observation from space of the ultraviolet tracks (290-430 nm) associated with giant extensive air showers produced by ultra-high energy primaries propagating in the earth’s atmosphere. Observing from an orbital altitude of ∼ 400 km, the mission is expected to reach an instantaneous geometrical aperture of Ageo ≥ 2 × 105 km2 sr with an estimated duty cycle of ∼ 20 %. Such a geometrical aperture allows unprecedented exposures, significantly larger than can be obtained with ground-based experiments. In this paper we briefly review the history of space-based search for ultra-high energy cosmic rays. We then introduce the special issue of Experimental Astronomy devoted to the various aspects of such a challenging enterprise. We also summarise the activities of the on-going JEM-EUSO program.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3-17
Number of pages15
JournalExperimental Astronomy
Volume40
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015 Nov 1

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cosmic rays
cosmic ray
Earth atmosphere
energy
universe
apertures
cosmic ray showers
International Space Station
astronomy
atmosphere
night
field of view
observatories
charged particles
energy spectra
neutrinos
modules
histories
telescopes
observatory

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Astronomy and Astrophysics
  • Space and Planetary Science

Cite this

The JEM-EUSO Collaboration. / The JEM-EUSO mission : An introduction. In: Experimental Astronomy. 2015 ; Vol. 40, No. 1. pp. 3-17.
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abstract = "The Extreme Universe Space Observatory on board the Japanese Experiment Module of the International Space Station, JEM-EUSO, is being designed to search from space ultra-high energy cosmic rays. These are charged particles with energies from a few 1019 eV to beyond 1020 eV, at the very end of the known cosmic ray energy spectrum. JEM-EUSO will also search for extreme energy neutrinos, photons, and exotic particles, providing a unique opportunity to explore largely unknown phenomena in our Universe. The mission, principally based on a wide field of view (60 degrees) near-UV telescope with a diameter of ∼ 2.5 m, will monitor the earth’s atmosphere at night, pioneering the observation from space of the ultraviolet tracks (290-430 nm) associated with giant extensive air showers produced by ultra-high energy primaries propagating in the earth’s atmosphere. Observing from an orbital altitude of ∼ 400 km, the mission is expected to reach an instantaneous geometrical aperture of Ageo ≥ 2 × 105 km2 sr with an estimated duty cycle of ∼ 20 {\%}. Such a geometrical aperture allows unprecedented exposures, significantly larger than can be obtained with ground-based experiments. In this paper we briefly review the history of space-based search for ultra-high energy cosmic rays. We then introduce the special issue of Experimental Astronomy devoted to the various aspects of such a challenging enterprise. We also summarise the activities of the on-going JEM-EUSO program.",
author = "{The JEM-EUSO Collaboration} and Adams, {J. H.} and S. Ahmad and Albert, {J. N.} and D. Allard and L. Anchordoqui and V. Andreev and A. Anzalone and Y. Arai and K. Asano and {Ave Pernas}, M. and P. Baragatti and P. Barrillon and T. Batsch and J. Bayer and R. Bechini and T. Belenguer and R. Bellotti and K. Belov and Berlind, {A. A.} and M. Bertaina and Biermann, {P. L.} and S. Biktemerova and C. Blaksley and N. Blanc and J. Błȩcki and S. Blin-Bondil and J. Bl{\"u}mer and P. Bobik and M. Bogomilov and M. Bonamente and Briggs, {M. S.} and S. Briz and A. Bruno and F. Cafagna and D. Campana and Capdevielle, {J. N.} and R. Caruso and M. Casolino and C. Cassardo and G. Castellini and C. Catalano and O. Catalano and A. Cellino and M. Chikawa and Christl, {M. J.} and D. Cline and V. Connaughton and L. Conti and G. Cordero and Crawford, {H. J.}",
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The JEM-EUSO mission : An introduction. / The JEM-EUSO Collaboration.

In: Experimental Astronomy, Vol. 40, No. 1, 01.11.2015, p. 3-17.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - The JEM-EUSO mission

T2 - An introduction

AU - The JEM-EUSO Collaboration

AU - Adams, J. H.

AU - Ahmad, S.

AU - Albert, J. N.

AU - Allard, D.

AU - Anchordoqui, L.

AU - Andreev, V.

AU - Anzalone, A.

AU - Arai, Y.

AU - Asano, K.

AU - Ave Pernas, M.

AU - Baragatti, P.

AU - Barrillon, P.

AU - Batsch, T.

AU - Bayer, J.

AU - Bechini, R.

AU - Belenguer, T.

AU - Bellotti, R.

AU - Belov, K.

AU - Berlind, A. A.

AU - Bertaina, M.

AU - Biermann, P. L.

AU - Biktemerova, S.

AU - Blaksley, C.

AU - Blanc, N.

AU - Błȩcki, J.

AU - Blin-Bondil, S.

AU - Blümer, J.

AU - Bobik, P.

AU - Bogomilov, M.

AU - Bonamente, M.

AU - Briggs, M. S.

AU - Briz, S.

AU - Bruno, A.

AU - Cafagna, F.

AU - Campana, D.

AU - Capdevielle, J. N.

AU - Caruso, R.

AU - Casolino, M.

AU - Cassardo, C.

AU - Castellini, G.

AU - Catalano, C.

AU - Catalano, O.

AU - Cellino, A.

AU - Chikawa, M.

AU - Christl, M. J.

AU - Cline, D.

AU - Connaughton, V.

AU - Conti, L.

AU - Cordero, G.

AU - Crawford, H. J.

PY - 2015/11/1

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