The myth of origin in context through the lens of deconstruction, dialogism, and hybridity

Sung Uk Lim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The present study aims to deconstruct the myth of origin, a quest after essential identity, in the context of Japan's colonization of Korea (1910-1945). First, I will contextualize the myth of origin as a particular historical construction of Japanese colonization, which stems from Romantic nationalism in the second half of the 19th century. Then, I will critique the structuralism, monologism, and colonialism standing behind the myth of origin through the lens of deconstruction, dialogism, and hybridity: (1) Jacques Derrida's deconstruction and différance will show the self-implosion of the totalizing, centering vision of structuralism; (2) Mikhail Bakhtin's dialogism will analyze colonial discourse as a double-voiced discourse constituting both dominant discourse and counter-dominant discourse; (3) Homi Bhabha will demonstrate that colonial identity is ambivalent and hybrid through partial mimicry.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)112-131
Number of pages20
JournalJournal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies
Volume10
Issue number29
Publication statusPublished - 2011 Nov 11

Fingerprint

Dialogism
Hybridity
Deconstruction
Discourse
Colonization
Structuralism
Korea
Jacques Derrida
Mimicry
Japan
Nationalism
Colonies
Mikhail Bakhtin
Colonialism
Colonial Discourse

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Religious studies
  • Philosophy

Cite this

@article{0a0817f58e4c43cd95baec8209748961,
title = "The myth of origin in context through the lens of deconstruction, dialogism, and hybridity",
abstract = "The present study aims to deconstruct the myth of origin, a quest after essential identity, in the context of Japan's colonization of Korea (1910-1945). First, I will contextualize the myth of origin as a particular historical construction of Japanese colonization, which stems from Romantic nationalism in the second half of the 19th century. Then, I will critique the structuralism, monologism, and colonialism standing behind the myth of origin through the lens of deconstruction, dialogism, and hybridity: (1) Jacques Derrida's deconstruction and diff{\'e}rance will show the self-implosion of the totalizing, centering vision of structuralism; (2) Mikhail Bakhtin's dialogism will analyze colonial discourse as a double-voiced discourse constituting both dominant discourse and counter-dominant discourse; (3) Homi Bhabha will demonstrate that colonial identity is ambivalent and hybrid through partial mimicry.",
author = "Lim, {Sung Uk}",
year = "2011",
month = "11",
day = "11",
language = "English",
volume = "10",
pages = "112--131",
journal = "Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies",
issn = "1583-0039",
publisher = "Universitatea Babes-Bolyai, Catedra de Filosofie Sistematica",
number = "29",

}

The myth of origin in context through the lens of deconstruction, dialogism, and hybridity. / Lim, Sung Uk.

In: Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies, Vol. 10, No. 29, 11.11.2011, p. 112-131.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - The myth of origin in context through the lens of deconstruction, dialogism, and hybridity

AU - Lim, Sung Uk

PY - 2011/11/11

Y1 - 2011/11/11

N2 - The present study aims to deconstruct the myth of origin, a quest after essential identity, in the context of Japan's colonization of Korea (1910-1945). First, I will contextualize the myth of origin as a particular historical construction of Japanese colonization, which stems from Romantic nationalism in the second half of the 19th century. Then, I will critique the structuralism, monologism, and colonialism standing behind the myth of origin through the lens of deconstruction, dialogism, and hybridity: (1) Jacques Derrida's deconstruction and différance will show the self-implosion of the totalizing, centering vision of structuralism; (2) Mikhail Bakhtin's dialogism will analyze colonial discourse as a double-voiced discourse constituting both dominant discourse and counter-dominant discourse; (3) Homi Bhabha will demonstrate that colonial identity is ambivalent and hybrid through partial mimicry.

AB - The present study aims to deconstruct the myth of origin, a quest after essential identity, in the context of Japan's colonization of Korea (1910-1945). First, I will contextualize the myth of origin as a particular historical construction of Japanese colonization, which stems from Romantic nationalism in the second half of the 19th century. Then, I will critique the structuralism, monologism, and colonialism standing behind the myth of origin through the lens of deconstruction, dialogism, and hybridity: (1) Jacques Derrida's deconstruction and différance will show the self-implosion of the totalizing, centering vision of structuralism; (2) Mikhail Bakhtin's dialogism will analyze colonial discourse as a double-voiced discourse constituting both dominant discourse and counter-dominant discourse; (3) Homi Bhabha will demonstrate that colonial identity is ambivalent and hybrid through partial mimicry.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=80655127895&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=80655127895&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 10

SP - 112

EP - 131

JO - Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies

JF - Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies

SN - 1583-0039

IS - 29

ER -