The perception of animal experimentation ethics among Indian teenage school pupils

Justin Namuk Kim, Eun Hee Choi, Soo-Ki Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

To promote awareness of animal experimentation ethics among teenagers, we created an educational pamphlet and an accompanying questionnaire. One hundred Indian teenage school pupils were given the pamphlet and subsequently surveyed with the questionnaire, to evaluate: a) their perception of animal experimentation ethics; and b) their opinion on the effectiveness of the pamphlet, according to gender and school grade/age. There was a significant correlation between grade/age and support for animal experimentation, i.e. senior students were more inclined to show support for animal experimentation. There was also a significant correlation between gender and perception of the need to learn about animal experimentation ethics, with girls more likely to feel the need to learn about ethics than boys. In addition, the four questions relating to the usefulness of the pamphlet, and student satisfaction with its content, received positive responses from the majority of the students. Even though the pamphlet was concise, it was apparent that three quarters of the students were satisfied with its content. Gender and age did not influence this level of satisfaction. Overall, our study shows that there is a significant correlation between a pupil's school grade/age and their support for animal experimentation, and that there is also a significant correlation between gender and the perceived need to learn about animal experimentation ethics. This pilot scheme involving an educational pamphlet and questionnaire could be beneficial in helping to formulate basic strategies for educating teenage school pupils about animal ethics.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)27-35
Number of pages9
JournalATLA Alternatives to Laboratory Animals
Volume45
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 2017 Mar 1

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Pupil
Pamphlets
Ethics
Animals
Students
Surveys and Questionnaires

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Toxicology
  • Medical Laboratory Technology

Cite this

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The perception of animal experimentation ethics among Indian teenage school pupils. / Kim, Justin Namuk; Choi, Eun Hee; Kim, Soo-Ki.

In: ATLA Alternatives to Laboratory Animals, Vol. 45, No. 1, 01.03.2017, p. 27-35.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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