The Quest for a Truly Universal Influenza Vaccine

Yo Han Jang, Baik Lin Seong

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

There is an unmet public health need for a universal influenza vaccine (UIV) to provide broad and durable protection from influenza virus infections. The identification of broadly protective antibodies and cross-reactive T cells directed to influenza viral targets present a promising prospect for the development of a UIV. Multiple targets for cross-protection have been identified in the stalk and head of hemagglutinin (HA) to develop a UIV. Recently, neuraminidase (NA) has received significant attention as a critical component for increasing the breadth of protection. The HA stalk-based approaches have shown promising results of broader protection in animal studies, and their feasibility in humans are being evaluated in clinical trials. Mucosal immune responses and cross-reactive T cell immunity across influenza A and B viruses intrinsic to live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) have emerged as essential features to be incorporated into a UIV. Complementing the weakness of the stand-alone approaches, prime-boost vaccination combining HA stalk, and LAIV is under clinical evaluation, with the aim to increase the efficacy and broaden the spectrum of protection. Preexisting immunity in humans established by prior exposure to influenza viruses may affect the hierarchy and magnitude of immune responses elicited by an influenza vaccine, limiting the interpretation of preclinical data based on naive animals, necessitating human challenge studies. A consensus is yet to be achieved on the spectrum of protection, efficacy, target population, and duration of protection to define a “universal” vaccine. This review discusses the recent advancements in the development of UIVs, rationales behind cross-protection and vaccine designs, and challenges faced in obtaining balanced protection potency, a wide spectrum of protection, and safety relevant to UIVs.

Original languageEnglish
Article number344
JournalFrontiers in Cellular and Infection Microbiology
Volume9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019 Oct 10

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Influenza Vaccines
Hemagglutinins
Cross Protection
Attenuated Vaccines
Orthomyxoviridae
Immunity
Vaccines
Influenza B virus
T-Lymphocytes
Mucosal Immunity
Health Services Needs and Demand
Influenza A virus
Neuraminidase
Feasibility Studies
Virus Diseases
Human Influenza
Vaccination
Public Health
Clinical Trials
Safety

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Microbiology
  • Immunology
  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

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The Quest for a Truly Universal Influenza Vaccine. / Jang, Yo Han; Seong, Baik Lin.

In: Frontiers in Cellular and Infection Microbiology, Vol. 9, 344, 10.10.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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