The results of antegrade continence enema using a retubularized sigmoidostomy

Soo Min Ahn, Sang Won Han, Seung Hoon Choi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Left colonic antegrade continence enema (ACE) has been reported only as an alternative to right colonic ACE-the Malone appendicostomy and Monti retubularized ileostomy. This paper evaluated the advantages of left colonic ACE using a retubularized sigmoidostomy (RS) as an appropriate method for maintaining fecal continence and as a first-line surgical treatment for patients with fecal incontinence or intractable constipation. Ten patients underwent surgery between March 2002 and June 2003: seven with meningomyelocele, one with cloacal anomaly, one with anorectal malformation, and one with lipoma of the spine. An RS tube was fashioned and then implanted using a segment of the sigmoid colon and exteriorized through the umbilicus. An enema was done 10 days after surgery using only normal saline. The outcomes were assessed after adjusting to the appropriate enema regimen for the 10 cases. The mean duration of the enema was 23.0 ± 8.4 min, with 250 ml (range 80-800) as the median volume of fluid used. The enema interval ranged from 1-3 days. No patient showed any abdominal discomfort or soiling episodes, with the exception of one who experienced daytime fecal staining, but this occurred less than once per month. The self-cosmesis for the umbilical stoma was satisfactory. The RS procedure provided excellent continence control, with a shortening of the enema duration, a lower fluid volume, and good cosmesis, and without any ACE-related abdominal pain. This procedure can be used as a first-choice surgical treatment for intractable constipation and fecal incontinence.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)488-491
Number of pages4
JournalPediatric Surgery International
Volume20
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2004 Jul 1

    Fingerprint

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Surgery

Cite this