The role of lifestyle risk factors on mortality from colorectal cancer in populations of the Asia pacific region

Alireza Ansary-Moghaddam, Rachel Huxley, Tai Hing Lam, Hirotsugu Ueshima, DF F. Gu, HyeonChang Kim, Mark Woodward

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although colorectal cancer is one of the leading malignancies worldwide, there are few data on aetiological relationships from the Asia-Pacific region. Therefore, a collaborative study was conducted involving over half a million subjects from 33 cohort studies in the region. Age-adjusted death rates from colorectal cancer, over an average of 6.8 years follow-up, were 12 and 14 per 100,000 person-years among Asian women and men, respectively; corresponding values in Australasia were 31 and 41. Height was strongly associated with death from colorectal cancer: an extra 5cm of height was associated with 10% (95% confidence interval, 3% - 18%) additional risk, after adjustment for other factors. Smoking increased risk by 43% (9% - 88%), although no significant dose-response relationship was discerned (p >0.05). Other significant (p <0.05) risk factors were body mass index and lack of physical activity. There was no significant effect on colorectal cancer mortality for alcohol consumption, waist circumference, fasting blood glucose or diabetes, although the latter conferred a notable 26% additional risk. Height may be a biomarker for some currently unknown genetic, or environmental, risk factors that are related both to skeletal growth and mutanogenesis. Understanding such mechanisms could provide opportunities for novel preventive and therapeutic intervention.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)191-198
Number of pages8
JournalAsian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention
Volume8
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 2007 Jan 1

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Life Style
Colorectal Neoplasms
Mortality
Population
Australasia
Risk Adjustment
Waist Circumference
Alcohol Drinking
Blood Glucose
Fasting
Body Mass Index
Cohort Studies
Biomarkers
Smoking
Confidence Intervals
Exercise
Growth
Neoplasms
Therapeutics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Epidemiology
  • Oncology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Ansary-Moghaddam, A., Huxley, R., Lam, T. H., Ueshima, H., Gu, DF. F., Kim, H., & Woodward, M. (2007). The role of lifestyle risk factors on mortality from colorectal cancer in populations of the Asia pacific region. Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention, 8(2), 191-198.
Ansary-Moghaddam, Alireza ; Huxley, Rachel ; Lam, Tai Hing ; Ueshima, Hirotsugu ; Gu, DF F. ; Kim, HyeonChang ; Woodward, Mark. / The role of lifestyle risk factors on mortality from colorectal cancer in populations of the Asia pacific region. In: Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention. 2007 ; Vol. 8, No. 2. pp. 191-198.
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Ansary-Moghaddam, A, Huxley, R, Lam, TH, Ueshima, H, Gu, DFF, Kim, H & Woodward, M 2007, 'The role of lifestyle risk factors on mortality from colorectal cancer in populations of the Asia pacific region', Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention, vol. 8, no. 2, pp. 191-198.

The role of lifestyle risk factors on mortality from colorectal cancer in populations of the Asia pacific region. / Ansary-Moghaddam, Alireza; Huxley, Rachel; Lam, Tai Hing; Ueshima, Hirotsugu; Gu, DF F.; Kim, HyeonChang; Woodward, Mark.

In: Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention, Vol. 8, No. 2, 01.01.2007, p. 191-198.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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