The role of neighborhoods in household food insufficiency

Considering interactions between physical disorder, low social capital, violence, and perceptions of danger

Dylan B. Jackson, Kecia R. Johnson, Michael George Vaughn, Marissa E. Hinton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Rationale: Food insecurity is a significant public health concern, with implications for community and individual health and well-being. Although a growing body of literature points to the role of neighborhoods in household food insecurity, studies using nationally representative samples to explore interactions between neighborhood risks – including violence and danger – are lacking. Objective: The present study examines whether interactions between physical disorder, low social capital, and violence/danger in the neighborhood have significant implications for the risk of household food insufficiency using a large, nationally representative sample of U.S. children and their families. Method: Data are from the 2016 National Survey of Children's Health, a survey of a cross-sectional weighted probability sample of U.S. children from 0 to 17 years of age. Multinomial logistic regression techniques were used to analyze the data. Results: Neighborhood risk factors interacted to predict household food insufficiency, with the confluence of low social capital and violence/danger yielding the strongest effects. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that food hardship should be addressed within the context of neighborhood revitalization. The risk of food insufficiency among children and families in especially high-risk ecological contexts might be ameliorated with the provision of informal and formal sources of nutrition assistance and support.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)58-67
Number of pages10
JournalSocial Science and Medicine
Volume221
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019 Jan 1

Fingerprint

Social Perception
Violence
social capital
violence
food
Food
interaction
nutrition situation
Food Supply
Sampling Studies
health
nutrition
Health Surveys
assistance
public health
well-being
logistics
Social Capital
Physical
Interaction

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health(social science)
  • History and Philosophy of Science

Cite this

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The role of neighborhoods in household food insufficiency : Considering interactions between physical disorder, low social capital, violence, and perceptions of danger. / Jackson, Dylan B.; Johnson, Kecia R.; Vaughn, Michael George; Hinton, Marissa E.

In: Social Science and Medicine, Vol. 221, 01.01.2019, p. 58-67.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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