The roles of glutamine in the intestine and its implication in intestinal diseases

Min Hyun Kim, Hyeyoung Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

58 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Glutamine, the most abundant free amino acid in the human body, is a major substrate utilized by intestinal cells. The roles of glutamine in intestinal physiology and management of multiple intestinal diseases have been reported. In gut physiology, glutamine promotes enterocyte proliferation, regulates tight junction proteins, suppresses pro-inflammatory signaling pathways, and protects cells against apoptosis and cellular stresses during normal and pathologic conditions. As glutamine stores are depleted during severe metabolic stress including trauma, sepsis, and inflammatory bowel diseases, glutamine supplementation has been examined in patients to improve their clinical outcomes. In this review, we discuss the physiological roles of glutamine for intestinal health and its underlying mechanisms. In addition, we discuss the current evidence for the efficacy of glutamine supplementation in intestinal diseases.

Original languageEnglish
Article number1051
JournalInternational journal of molecular sciences
Volume18
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017 May 12

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This work was supported by Brain Korea 21 PLUS Project for Bioactive Nutrition, Yonsei University, Korea.

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Catalysis
  • Molecular Biology
  • Spectroscopy
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry
  • Organic Chemistry
  • Inorganic Chemistry

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