The Triple Crown of Antisocial Behavior: Effortful Control, Negative Emotionality, and Community Disadvantage

Kevin T. Wolff, Michael T. Baglivio, Alex R. Piquero, Michael George Vaughn, Matt DeLisi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examines the effect of negative emotionality, effortful control, and community disadvantage on juvenile recidivism. Using DeLisi and Vaughn’s temperament theory as a foundation, we assess whether youth who have temperament issues and those who live in disadvantaged communities are more likely to recidivate. Findings indicate that net of a wide array of known risk factors, youth with poor temperaments, and those living in disadvantaged communities are more likely to reoffend. Additionally, those youth who face a triple threat of temperament issues and disadvantage reoffend faster post-completion. The theoretical and policy implications of these findings are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)350-366
Number of pages17
JournalYouth Violence and Juvenile Justice
Volume14
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016 Oct 1

Fingerprint

behavior control
emotionality
Behavior Control
Temperament
Crowns
Vulnerable Populations
community
threat

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health(social science)
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Law

Cite this

Wolff, Kevin T. ; Baglivio, Michael T. ; Piquero, Alex R. ; Vaughn, Michael George ; DeLisi, Matt. / The Triple Crown of Antisocial Behavior : Effortful Control, Negative Emotionality, and Community Disadvantage. In: Youth Violence and Juvenile Justice. 2016 ; Vol. 14, No. 4. pp. 350-366.
@article{621608857e254bd4b31b6f342fa0a5e3,
title = "The Triple Crown of Antisocial Behavior: Effortful Control, Negative Emotionality, and Community Disadvantage",
abstract = "This study examines the effect of negative emotionality, effortful control, and community disadvantage on juvenile recidivism. Using DeLisi and Vaughn’s temperament theory as a foundation, we assess whether youth who have temperament issues and those who live in disadvantaged communities are more likely to recidivate. Findings indicate that net of a wide array of known risk factors, youth with poor temperaments, and those living in disadvantaged communities are more likely to reoffend. Additionally, those youth who face a triple threat of temperament issues and disadvantage reoffend faster post-completion. The theoretical and policy implications of these findings are discussed.",
author = "Wolff, {Kevin T.} and Baglivio, {Michael T.} and Piquero, {Alex R.} and Vaughn, {Michael George} and Matt DeLisi",
year = "2016",
month = "10",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1177/1541204015599042",
language = "English",
volume = "14",
pages = "350--366",
journal = "Youth Violence and Juvenile Justice",
issn = "1541-2040",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Inc.",
number = "4",

}

The Triple Crown of Antisocial Behavior : Effortful Control, Negative Emotionality, and Community Disadvantage. / Wolff, Kevin T.; Baglivio, Michael T.; Piquero, Alex R.; Vaughn, Michael George; DeLisi, Matt.

In: Youth Violence and Juvenile Justice, Vol. 14, No. 4, 01.10.2016, p. 350-366.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - The Triple Crown of Antisocial Behavior

T2 - Effortful Control, Negative Emotionality, and Community Disadvantage

AU - Wolff, Kevin T.

AU - Baglivio, Michael T.

AU - Piquero, Alex R.

AU - Vaughn, Michael George

AU - DeLisi, Matt

PY - 2016/10/1

Y1 - 2016/10/1

N2 - This study examines the effect of negative emotionality, effortful control, and community disadvantage on juvenile recidivism. Using DeLisi and Vaughn’s temperament theory as a foundation, we assess whether youth who have temperament issues and those who live in disadvantaged communities are more likely to recidivate. Findings indicate that net of a wide array of known risk factors, youth with poor temperaments, and those living in disadvantaged communities are more likely to reoffend. Additionally, those youth who face a triple threat of temperament issues and disadvantage reoffend faster post-completion. The theoretical and policy implications of these findings are discussed.

AB - This study examines the effect of negative emotionality, effortful control, and community disadvantage on juvenile recidivism. Using DeLisi and Vaughn’s temperament theory as a foundation, we assess whether youth who have temperament issues and those who live in disadvantaged communities are more likely to recidivate. Findings indicate that net of a wide array of known risk factors, youth with poor temperaments, and those living in disadvantaged communities are more likely to reoffend. Additionally, those youth who face a triple threat of temperament issues and disadvantage reoffend faster post-completion. The theoretical and policy implications of these findings are discussed.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85032069568&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85032069568&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1177/1541204015599042

DO - 10.1177/1541204015599042

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85032069568

VL - 14

SP - 350

EP - 366

JO - Youth Violence and Juvenile Justice

JF - Youth Violence and Juvenile Justice

SN - 1541-2040

IS - 4

ER -