Thermal sensation and social feelings - Skin temperature changes with social inclusion or exclusion

Min Jae Kim, Ji Eun Choi, Yoo Rim Choi, Chung Yoon Chun

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

Do social feelings such as happiness, loneliness, inclusion and exclusion feel warm or cold to people experiencing them? Zhong and Leonardelli (2008) showed evidence that social exclusion evokes a feeling of extreme cold. The subjects who experience social exclusion gave lower estimates of room temperature as compared to subjects who experience inclusion. This study wants to find the answer to the question, "Do physiological responses correspond to 'psychological cold'?". Specifically, does skin temperature decrease when participants feel psychologically cold? The change of the skin temperature was investigated under the same experimental conditions as those of Zhong's study. The average skin temperature based on a 7-point scale was recorded subjectively. Subjects estimated room temperature and thermal sensation during and after social inclusion or exclusion. A total of 20 students participated in this experiment, recalling situations in which they felt socially excluded or included. The purpose of this study was to examine human physiological responses related to changes in psychological states and assess the possibility that perceptual simulation can affect thermal sensation or comfort. [Include results here.].

Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 2009 Dec 1
Event9th International Healthy Buildings Conference and Exhibition, HB 2009 - Syracuse, NY, United States
Duration: 2009 Sep 132009 Sep 17

Other

Other9th International Healthy Buildings Conference and Exhibition, HB 2009
CountryUnited States
CitySyracuse, NY
Period09/9/1309/9/17

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All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Civil and Structural Engineering
  • Building and Construction

Cite this

Kim, M. J., Choi, J. E., Choi, Y. R., & Chun, C. Y. (2009). Thermal sensation and social feelings - Skin temperature changes with social inclusion or exclusion. Paper presented at 9th International Healthy Buildings Conference and Exhibition, HB 2009, Syracuse, NY, United States.