Tinnitus and Its Association With Mental Health and Health-Related Quality of Life in an Older Population: A Nationwide Cross-Sectional Study

Hye Min Park, Jinsei Jung, Jong Koo Kim, Yong Jae Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study investigated the relationship of tinnitus with mental health and health-related quality of life (QoL) in older people. Data source included 5,129 community-dwelling men and women ≥60 years old from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Tinnitus was categorized into three groups: normal, tolerable tinnitus, and annoying tinnitus. Mental health and health-related QoL were assessed according to three dimensions (depressive mood, psychological distress, and suicidal ideation) and five domains (impaired mobility, impaired self-care, impaired usual activities, pain/discomfort, and anxiety/depression). The odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of mental health and health-related QoL were calculated using multiple logistic regression analyses. Annoying tinnitus was positively and independently associated with deteriorated mental health and health-related QoL, suggesting comprehensive care is needed in older people with annoying tinnitus.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)181-186
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Applied Gerontology
Volume41
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2022 Jan

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
The authors would like to thank the Korea Center for Disease Control and Prevention for conducting KNHANES and supplying data for the study. The author(s) received no financial support for the research, authorship, and/or publication of this article.

Publisher Copyright:
© The Author(s) 2020.

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Gerontology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Tinnitus and Its Association With Mental Health and Health-Related Quality of Life in an Older Population: A Nationwide Cross-Sectional Study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this