Tissue-engineered Human Living Skin Substitutes: Development and Clinical Application

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

68 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The skin acts as a barrier to exogenous substances, pathogens, and trauma. Skin defects caused by burns, venous ulcer, diabetic ulcer, or acute injury occasionally induce life-threatening situations. Tissue engineering provides an alternative for autologous or allogeneic tissue transplantation, which is required because of donor site limitations and the risks of transmitting infection. Currently, skin substitutes are made of only extracellular matrix, mainly cells, or combination of cells and matrices. New biotechnological approaches have led to the development of the skin equivalent, the closest match yet to native human skin in terms of histological and functional properties. This review article focuses upon the development of the in vitro and in vivo epidermis and dermis and their clinical applications.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)774-779
Number of pages6
JournalYonsei Medical Journal
Volume41
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2000 Jan 1

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Artificial Skin
Skin
Tissue Transplantation
Varicose Ulcer
Homologous Transplantation
Wounds and Injuries
Tissue Engineering
Dermis
Burns
Population Groups
Epidermis
Ulcer
Extracellular Matrix
Tissue Donors
Infection

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

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Tissue-engineered Human Living Skin Substitutes : Development and Clinical Application. / Lee, Kwanghoon.

In: Yonsei Medical Journal, Vol. 41, No. 6, 01.01.2000, p. 774-779.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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