Topography of the submental artery that should be considered in bleeding during dentoalveolar surgery

Da Hye Kim, Sung Yoon Won, Da Yae Choi, Hong San Kim, Ui Won Jung, Hee Jin Kim, Kyung Seok Hu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of the present study was to provide precise data regarding the branching pattern of the submental artery, which should be considered in occasions of bleeding during various dentoalveolar surgical procedures of the mandible, such as implant surgeries, tori removal, and iatrogenic injuries. Twenty-six embalmed adult hemifaces from Korean cadavers were used in this study. The vertical distance, horizontal distance, and diameter of the submental artery were measured from the site of the first premolar to the third molar. In cases where there was penetration of the mylohyoid muscle by the main branches of the submental artery, the same items were measured at that point. The vertical distance between the submental artery and the inferior border of the mandible decreased toward the premolar, whereas the horizontal distance from the lingual plate of the mandible increased gradually as it traveled in the anterior direction. The diameter of the artery narrowed slightly toward the premolar. The main branches of the submental artery perforated the mylohyoid muscle in 14 (54%) of the 26 specimens. As a result of this study, the submental artery is located higher from the inferior border and closer to the lingual plate of the mandible in the region of the molar than that of the premolar. Therefore, clinicians should be more careful of bleeding when performing surgery in the molar region compared with the premolar region. Where the mylohyoid muscle is perforated by the main branches of the submental artery, its point of insertion can be observed in diverse locations.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1453-1456
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Craniofacial Surgery
Volume23
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012 Sep 1

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Arteries
Bicuspid
Hemorrhage
Mandible
Tongue
Muscles
Third Molar
Cadaver
Wounds and Injuries

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Otorhinolaryngology

Cite this

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abstract = "The purpose of the present study was to provide precise data regarding the branching pattern of the submental artery, which should be considered in occasions of bleeding during various dentoalveolar surgical procedures of the mandible, such as implant surgeries, tori removal, and iatrogenic injuries. Twenty-six embalmed adult hemifaces from Korean cadavers were used in this study. The vertical distance, horizontal distance, and diameter of the submental artery were measured from the site of the first premolar to the third molar. In cases where there was penetration of the mylohyoid muscle by the main branches of the submental artery, the same items were measured at that point. The vertical distance between the submental artery and the inferior border of the mandible decreased toward the premolar, whereas the horizontal distance from the lingual plate of the mandible increased gradually as it traveled in the anterior direction. The diameter of the artery narrowed slightly toward the premolar. The main branches of the submental artery perforated the mylohyoid muscle in 14 (54{\%}) of the 26 specimens. As a result of this study, the submental artery is located higher from the inferior border and closer to the lingual plate of the mandible in the region of the molar than that of the premolar. Therefore, clinicians should be more careful of bleeding when performing surgery in the molar region compared with the premolar region. Where the mylohyoid muscle is perforated by the main branches of the submental artery, its point of insertion can be observed in diverse locations.",
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Topography of the submental artery that should be considered in bleeding during dentoalveolar surgery. / Kim, Da Hye; Won, Sung Yoon; Choi, Da Yae; Kim, Hong San; Jung, Ui Won; Kim, Hee Jin; Hu, Kyung Seok.

In: Journal of Craniofacial Surgery, Vol. 23, No. 5, 01.09.2012, p. 1453-1456.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Jung, Ui Won

AU - Kim, Hee Jin

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