Transducible form of p47 phox and p67 phox compensate for defective NADPH oxidase activity in neutrophils of patients with chronic granulomatous disease

Fumiko Honda, Yumiko Hane, Tomoko Toma, Akihiro Yachie, Eun Sung Kim, Sang Kyou Lee, Masatoshi Takagi, Shuki Mizutani, Tomohiro Morio

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Protein delivery to primary cells by protein transduction domain (PTD) serves as a novel measure for manipulation of the cells for biological study and for the treatment of various human conditions. Although the method has been employed to modulate cellular function in vitro, only limited reports are available on its application in the replacement of deficient signaling molecules into primary cells. We examined the potential of recombinant proteins to compensate for defective cytosolic components of the NADPH oxidase complex in chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) neutrophils in both p47 phox and p67 phox deficiency. The p47 phox or p67 phox protein linked to Hph-1 PTD was effectively expressed in soluble form and transduced into human neutrophils efficiently without eliciting unwanted signal transduction or apoptosis. The delivered protein was stable for more than 24h, expressed in the cytoplasm, translocated to the membrane fraction upon activation, and, most importantly able to restored reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Although research on human primary neutrophils using the protein delivery system is still limited, our data show that the protein transduction approach for neutrophils may be applicable to the control of local infections in CGD patients by direct delivery of the protein product.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)162-168
Number of pages7
JournalBiochemical and Biophysical Research Communications
Volume417
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012 Jan 6

Fingerprint

Chronic Granulomatous Disease
NADPH Oxidase
Neutrophils
Proteins
Infection Control
Recombinant Proteins
Signal transduction
neutrophil cytosol factor 67K
4-ethoxymethylene-2-phenyl-2-oxazoline-5-one
Reactive Oxygen Species
Signal Transduction
Cytoplasm
Apoptosis
Membranes
Chemical activation
Research
Molecules

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biophysics
  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Honda, Fumiko ; Hane, Yumiko ; Toma, Tomoko ; Yachie, Akihiro ; Kim, Eun Sung ; Lee, Sang Kyou ; Takagi, Masatoshi ; Mizutani, Shuki ; Morio, Tomohiro. / Transducible form of p47 phox and p67 phox compensate for defective NADPH oxidase activity in neutrophils of patients with chronic granulomatous disease In: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications. 2012 ; Vol. 417, No. 1. pp. 162-168.
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Transducible form of p47 phox and p67 phox compensate for defective NADPH oxidase activity in neutrophils of patients with chronic granulomatous disease . / Honda, Fumiko; Hane, Yumiko; Toma, Tomoko; Yachie, Akihiro; Kim, Eun Sung; Lee, Sang Kyou; Takagi, Masatoshi; Mizutani, Shuki; Morio, Tomohiro.

In: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications, Vol. 417, No. 1, 06.01.2012, p. 162-168.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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