Transgenic mice expressing the diphtheria toxin receptor are sensitive to the toxin

JeongHeon Cha, Mee Young Chang, James A. Richardson, Leon Eidels

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Whereas diphtheria and the mechanism of action of diphtheria toxin, the bacterial molecule that induces the disease, have been studied and understood for some time, the receptor that allows animal cells to bind the toxin escaped identification until recently. The receptor was identified by its ability to confer toxin-sensitivity to mouse cells, which are normally toxin-resistant. Although mice are also naturally resistant, we now demonstrate that transgenic mice expressing the diphtheria toxin receptor are as sensitive to the toxin as are humans and other toxin-sensitive animals. These transgenic mice provide a suitable model for studying modern antidotes for diphtheria.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)235-240
Number of pages6
JournalMolecular Microbiology
Volume49
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2003 Jul 1

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Diphtheria
Transgenic Mice
Diphtheria Toxin
Antidotes
Heparin-binding EGF-like Growth Factor

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Microbiology
  • Molecular Biology

Cite this

Cha, JeongHeon ; Chang, Mee Young ; Richardson, James A. ; Eidels, Leon. / Transgenic mice expressing the diphtheria toxin receptor are sensitive to the toxin. In: Molecular Microbiology. 2003 ; Vol. 49, No. 1. pp. 235-240.
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Transgenic mice expressing the diphtheria toxin receptor are sensitive to the toxin. / Cha, JeongHeon; Chang, Mee Young; Richardson, James A.; Eidels, Leon.

In: Molecular Microbiology, Vol. 49, No. 1, 01.07.2003, p. 235-240.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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