Traumatic brain injury, temperament, and violence in incarcerated youth: a mediation analysis based on Delisi and Vaughn’s theory of temperament and antisocial behavior

Christopher A. Veeh, Tanya Renn, Michael George Vaughn, Matt DeLisi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is associated with violent behavior. A possible key mechanism to explain the relationship between TBI and violence is DeLisi and Vaughn’s temperament-based theory of antisocial behavior. Accordingly, the current study investigates whether temperament–the combination of effortful control and negative emotionality–mediates the relationship between TBI and violent behavior within incarcerated youth. A non-probability sample of youth (N = 227) incarcerated in two long-term residential facilities completed a comprehensive assessment tool that collected data on TBI, temperament, childhood trauma, substance use, mental illness, and a variety of demographic characteristics. Preliminary results showed TBI significantly increased violent behavior, adjusting for confounds. Then, mediation analysis found that temperament accounted for 54% of the total effect between TBI and violence. The study findings show the potency of DeLisi and Vaughn’s temperamental construct in explaining the relationship between TBI and violent behavior within a sample of incarcerated youth. The dynamic interplay between effortful control and negative emotionality appears to be an important mechanism related to violent behavior. Both temperament constructs should be the focus of future assessment and intervention among incarcerated youth with TBI.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1016-1029
Number of pages14
JournalPsychology, Crime and Law
Volume24
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018 Nov 26

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Temperament
Violence
mediation
brain
violence
Residential Facilities
emotionality
Traumatic Brain Injury
mental illness
trauma
childhood
Demography
Wounds and Injuries

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Psychology(all)
  • Law

Cite this

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abstract = "Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is associated with violent behavior. A possible key mechanism to explain the relationship between TBI and violence is DeLisi and Vaughn’s temperament-based theory of antisocial behavior. Accordingly, the current study investigates whether temperament–the combination of effortful control and negative emotionality–mediates the relationship between TBI and violent behavior within incarcerated youth. A non-probability sample of youth (N = 227) incarcerated in two long-term residential facilities completed a comprehensive assessment tool that collected data on TBI, temperament, childhood trauma, substance use, mental illness, and a variety of demographic characteristics. Preliminary results showed TBI significantly increased violent behavior, adjusting for confounds. Then, mediation analysis found that temperament accounted for 54{\%} of the total effect between TBI and violence. The study findings show the potency of DeLisi and Vaughn’s temperamental construct in explaining the relationship between TBI and violent behavior within a sample of incarcerated youth. The dynamic interplay between effortful control and negative emotionality appears to be an important mechanism related to violent behavior. Both temperament constructs should be the focus of future assessment and intervention among incarcerated youth with TBI.",
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Traumatic brain injury, temperament, and violence in incarcerated youth : a mediation analysis based on Delisi and Vaughn’s theory of temperament and antisocial behavior. / Veeh, Christopher A.; Renn, Tanya; Vaughn, Michael George; DeLisi, Matt.

In: Psychology, Crime and Law, Vol. 24, No. 10, 26.11.2018, p. 1016-1029.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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