Triple-pronged engagement: China's approach to North Korea

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

For U.S. policymakers, the question of China's approach to North Korea is critical, because whether Washington likes it or not, the road to Pyongyang now leads through Beijing. Seoul, too, is looking to Beijing to handle Pyongyang. But South Korean anxieties over China's intentions and American reliance on Beijing's "leverage" obscure a clear picture of China's actual approach to North Korea. When considered with the cold eyes of foreign policy realism, China's approach reveals itself to be "neighborly engagement" based on three prongs: bilateral political ties, bilateral economic cooperation, and multilateral diplomatic engagement (the Six Party Talks). That is the reality with which U.S. and South Korean strategists have to work.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)69-73
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Foreign Policy Interests
Volume34
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012 Mar 1

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North Korea
China
economic cooperation
realism
foreign policy
road
anxiety

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Political Science and International Relations
  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

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Triple-pronged engagement : China's approach to North Korea. / Delury, John.

In: American Foreign Policy Interests, Vol. 34, No. 2, 01.03.2012, p. 69-73.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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