Ultracompliant Carbon Nanotube Direct Bladder Device

Dongxiao Yan, Tim M. Bruns, Yuting Wu, Lauren L. Zimmerman, Chris Stephan, Anne P. Cameron, Euisik Yoon, John P. Seymour

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The bladder, stomach, intestines, heart, and lungs all move dynamically to achieve their purpose. A long-term implantable device that can attach onto an organ, sense its movement, and deliver current to modify the organ function would be useful in many therapeutic applications. The bladder, for example, can suffer from incomplete contractions that result in urinary retention with patients requiring catheterization. Those affected may benefit from a combination of a strain sensor and electrical stimulator to better control bladder emptying. The materials and design of such a device made from thin layer carbon nanotube (CNT) and Ecoflex 00–50 are described and demonstrate its function with in vivo feline bladders. During bench-top characterization, the resistive and capacitive sensors exhibit stability throughout 5000 stretching cycles under physiology conditions. In vivo measurements with piezoresistive devices show a high correlation between sensor resistance and volume. Stimulation driven from platinum-silicone composite electrodes successfully induce bladder contraction. A method for reliable connection and packaging of medical grade wire to the CNT device is also presented. This work is an important step toward the translation of low-durometer elastomers, stretchable CNT percolation, and platinum-silicone composite, which are ideal for large-strain bioelectric applications to sense or modulate dynamic organ states.

Original languageEnglish
Article number1900477
JournalAdvanced Healthcare Materials
Volume8
Issue number20
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019 Oct 1

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Carbon Nanotubes
Carbon nanotubes
Urinary Bladder
Silicones
Platinum
Equipment and Supplies
Elastomers
Capacitive sensors
Sensors
Physiology
Composite materials
Stretching
Sense Organs
Packaging
Wire
Urinary Retention
Felidae
Product Packaging
Electrodes
Catheterization

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biomaterials
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Pharmaceutical Science

Cite this

Yan, D., Bruns, T. M., Wu, Y., Zimmerman, L. L., Stephan, C., Cameron, A. P., ... Seymour, J. P. (2019). Ultracompliant Carbon Nanotube Direct Bladder Device. Advanced Healthcare Materials, 8(20), [1900477]. https://doi.org/10.1002/adhm.201900477
Yan, Dongxiao ; Bruns, Tim M. ; Wu, Yuting ; Zimmerman, Lauren L. ; Stephan, Chris ; Cameron, Anne P. ; Yoon, Euisik ; Seymour, John P. / Ultracompliant Carbon Nanotube Direct Bladder Device. In: Advanced Healthcare Materials. 2019 ; Vol. 8, No. 20.
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Yan, D, Bruns, TM, Wu, Y, Zimmerman, LL, Stephan, C, Cameron, AP, Yoon, E & Seymour, JP 2019, 'Ultracompliant Carbon Nanotube Direct Bladder Device', Advanced Healthcare Materials, vol. 8, no. 20, 1900477. https://doi.org/10.1002/adhm.201900477

Ultracompliant Carbon Nanotube Direct Bladder Device. / Yan, Dongxiao; Bruns, Tim M.; Wu, Yuting; Zimmerman, Lauren L.; Stephan, Chris; Cameron, Anne P.; Yoon, Euisik; Seymour, John P.

In: Advanced Healthcare Materials, Vol. 8, No. 20, 1900477, 01.10.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Yan D, Bruns TM, Wu Y, Zimmerman LL, Stephan C, Cameron AP et al. Ultracompliant Carbon Nanotube Direct Bladder Device. Advanced Healthcare Materials. 2019 Oct 1;8(20). 1900477. https://doi.org/10.1002/adhm.201900477