Understanding Online Community Participation

A Technology Acceptance Perspective

Hua Wang, Jae Eun Chung, Namkee Park, Margaret L. McLaughlin, Janet Fulk

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

41 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Online community participation has not been well understood from the perspective of technology adoption and use. Using a national sample of 537 online community participants in the United States and structural equation modeling, this study demonstrates that the technology acceptance model (TAM) can provide a useful foundation for theoretical explanation. By empirically testing the original TAM and comparing it with an alternative model, our results confirmed that perceived usefulness (PU) outweighs perceived ease of use (PEOU) in explaining actual use. Our final model further suggested a feedback loop between PU and PEOU, which significantly improved the model fit at both global and local levels. In addition, three exogenous variables (i.e., Internet self-efficacy, community environment, and intrinsic motivation) were proposed and validated. These findings have clear implications for the structure of the TAM as well as for its usefulness for the newly burgeoning practice of online community participation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)781-801
Number of pages21
JournalCommunication Research
Volume39
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012 Dec 1

Fingerprint

internet community
acceptance
participation
intrinsic motivation
self-efficacy
Acceptance
Community Participation
Online Communities
Internet
Feedback
Testing
community
Usefulness

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Communication
  • Language and Linguistics
  • Linguistics and Language

Cite this

Wang, Hua ; Chung, Jae Eun ; Park, Namkee ; McLaughlin, Margaret L. ; Fulk, Janet. / Understanding Online Community Participation : A Technology Acceptance Perspective. In: Communication Research. 2012 ; Vol. 39, No. 6. pp. 781-801.
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Understanding Online Community Participation : A Technology Acceptance Perspective. / Wang, Hua; Chung, Jae Eun; Park, Namkee; McLaughlin, Margaret L.; Fulk, Janet.

In: Communication Research, Vol. 39, No. 6, 01.12.2012, p. 781-801.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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