Underweight and mortality

Joo Young Lee, Hyeon Chang Kim, Changsoo Kim, Keeho Park, Song Vogue Ahn, Dae Ryong Kang, Kay Tee Khaw, Walter C. Willett, Il Suh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective According to most prospective studies, being underweight (BMI<18·5 kg/m2) is associated with significantly higher mortality than being of normal weight, especially among smokers. We aimed to explore in a generally lean population whether being underweight is significantly associated with increased all-cause mortality. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting Korea Medical Insurance Corporation study with 14 years of follow-up. Subjects After excluding deaths within the first 5 years of follow-up (1993-1997) to minimize reverse causation and excluding participants without information about smoking and health status, 94 133 men and 48 496 women aged 35-59 years in 1990 were included. Results We documented 5411 (5·7 %) deaths in men and 762 (1·6 %) in women. Among never smokers, hazard ratios (HR) for underweight individuals were not significantly higher than those for normal-weight individuals (BMI=18·5-22·9 kg/m2): HR=0·87 (95 % CI 0·41, 1·84, P=0·72) for underweight men and HR=1·12 (95 % CI 0·76, 1·65, P=0·58) for underweight women. Among ex-smokers, HR=0·86 (95 % CI 0·38, 1·93, P=0·72) for underweight men and HR=3·77 (95 % CI 0·42, 32·29, P=0·24) for underweight women. Among current smokers, HR=1·60 (95 % CI 1·28, 2·01, P<0·001) for underweight men and HR=2·07 (95 % CI 0·43, 9·94, P=0·36) for underweight women. Conclusions The present study does not support that being underweight per se is associated with increased all-cause mortality in Korean men and women.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1751-1756
Number of pages6
JournalPublic Health Nutrition
Volume19
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016 Jul 1

Fingerprint

Thinness
Mortality
Prospective Studies
Weights and Measures
Korea
Insurance
Causality
Health Status
Cohort Studies
Smoking

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Lee, Joo Young ; Kim, Hyeon Chang ; Kim, Changsoo ; Park, Keeho ; Ahn, Song Vogue ; Kang, Dae Ryong ; Khaw, Kay Tee ; Willett, Walter C. ; Suh, Il. / Underweight and mortality. In: Public Health Nutrition. 2016 ; Vol. 19, No. 10. pp. 1751-1756.
@article{3ceb5f83fae9416abc572bcee6def87e,
title = "Underweight and mortality",
abstract = "Objective According to most prospective studies, being underweight (BMI<18·5 kg/m2) is associated with significantly higher mortality than being of normal weight, especially among smokers. We aimed to explore in a generally lean population whether being underweight is significantly associated with increased all-cause mortality. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting Korea Medical Insurance Corporation study with 14 years of follow-up. Subjects After excluding deaths within the first 5 years of follow-up (1993-1997) to minimize reverse causation and excluding participants without information about smoking and health status, 94 133 men and 48 496 women aged 35-59 years in 1990 were included. Results We documented 5411 (5·7 {\%}) deaths in men and 762 (1·6 {\%}) in women. Among never smokers, hazard ratios (HR) for underweight individuals were not significantly higher than those for normal-weight individuals (BMI=18·5-22·9 kg/m2): HR=0·87 (95 {\%} CI 0·41, 1·84, P=0·72) for underweight men and HR=1·12 (95 {\%} CI 0·76, 1·65, P=0·58) for underweight women. Among ex-smokers, HR=0·86 (95 {\%} CI 0·38, 1·93, P=0·72) for underweight men and HR=3·77 (95 {\%} CI 0·42, 32·29, P=0·24) for underweight women. Among current smokers, HR=1·60 (95 {\%} CI 1·28, 2·01, P<0·001) for underweight men and HR=2·07 (95 {\%} CI 0·43, 9·94, P=0·36) for underweight women. Conclusions The present study does not support that being underweight per se is associated with increased all-cause mortality in Korean men and women.",
author = "Lee, {Joo Young} and Kim, {Hyeon Chang} and Changsoo Kim and Keeho Park and Ahn, {Song Vogue} and Kang, {Dae Ryong} and Khaw, {Kay Tee} and Willett, {Walter C.} and Il Suh",
year = "2016",
month = "7",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1017/S136898001500302X",
language = "English",
volume = "19",
pages = "1751--1756",
journal = "Public Health Nutrition",
issn = "1368-9800",
publisher = "Cambridge University Press",
number = "10",

}

Lee, JY, Kim, HC, Kim, C, Park, K, Ahn, SV, Kang, DR, Khaw, KT, Willett, WC & Suh, I 2016, 'Underweight and mortality', Public Health Nutrition, vol. 19, no. 10, pp. 1751-1756. https://doi.org/10.1017/S136898001500302X

Underweight and mortality. / Lee, Joo Young; Kim, Hyeon Chang; Kim, Changsoo; Park, Keeho; Ahn, Song Vogue; Kang, Dae Ryong; Khaw, Kay Tee; Willett, Walter C.; Suh, Il.

In: Public Health Nutrition, Vol. 19, No. 10, 01.07.2016, p. 1751-1756.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Underweight and mortality

AU - Lee, Joo Young

AU - Kim, Hyeon Chang

AU - Kim, Changsoo

AU - Park, Keeho

AU - Ahn, Song Vogue

AU - Kang, Dae Ryong

AU - Khaw, Kay Tee

AU - Willett, Walter C.

AU - Suh, Il

PY - 2016/7/1

Y1 - 2016/7/1

N2 - Objective According to most prospective studies, being underweight (BMI<18·5 kg/m2) is associated with significantly higher mortality than being of normal weight, especially among smokers. We aimed to explore in a generally lean population whether being underweight is significantly associated with increased all-cause mortality. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting Korea Medical Insurance Corporation study with 14 years of follow-up. Subjects After excluding deaths within the first 5 years of follow-up (1993-1997) to minimize reverse causation and excluding participants without information about smoking and health status, 94 133 men and 48 496 women aged 35-59 years in 1990 were included. Results We documented 5411 (5·7 %) deaths in men and 762 (1·6 %) in women. Among never smokers, hazard ratios (HR) for underweight individuals were not significantly higher than those for normal-weight individuals (BMI=18·5-22·9 kg/m2): HR=0·87 (95 % CI 0·41, 1·84, P=0·72) for underweight men and HR=1·12 (95 % CI 0·76, 1·65, P=0·58) for underweight women. Among ex-smokers, HR=0·86 (95 % CI 0·38, 1·93, P=0·72) for underweight men and HR=3·77 (95 % CI 0·42, 32·29, P=0·24) for underweight women. Among current smokers, HR=1·60 (95 % CI 1·28, 2·01, P<0·001) for underweight men and HR=2·07 (95 % CI 0·43, 9·94, P=0·36) for underweight women. Conclusions The present study does not support that being underweight per se is associated with increased all-cause mortality in Korean men and women.

AB - Objective According to most prospective studies, being underweight (BMI<18·5 kg/m2) is associated with significantly higher mortality than being of normal weight, especially among smokers. We aimed to explore in a generally lean population whether being underweight is significantly associated with increased all-cause mortality. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting Korea Medical Insurance Corporation study with 14 years of follow-up. Subjects After excluding deaths within the first 5 years of follow-up (1993-1997) to minimize reverse causation and excluding participants without information about smoking and health status, 94 133 men and 48 496 women aged 35-59 years in 1990 were included. Results We documented 5411 (5·7 %) deaths in men and 762 (1·6 %) in women. Among never smokers, hazard ratios (HR) for underweight individuals were not significantly higher than those for normal-weight individuals (BMI=18·5-22·9 kg/m2): HR=0·87 (95 % CI 0·41, 1·84, P=0·72) for underweight men and HR=1·12 (95 % CI 0·76, 1·65, P=0·58) for underweight women. Among ex-smokers, HR=0·86 (95 % CI 0·38, 1·93, P=0·72) for underweight men and HR=3·77 (95 % CI 0·42, 32·29, P=0·24) for underweight women. Among current smokers, HR=1·60 (95 % CI 1·28, 2·01, P<0·001) for underweight men and HR=2·07 (95 % CI 0·43, 9·94, P=0·36) for underweight women. Conclusions The present study does not support that being underweight per se is associated with increased all-cause mortality in Korean men and women.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84944112206&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84944112206&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1017/S136898001500302X

DO - 10.1017/S136898001500302X

M3 - Article

C2 - 26466868

AN - SCOPUS:84944112206

VL - 19

SP - 1751

EP - 1756

JO - Public Health Nutrition

JF - Public Health Nutrition

SN - 1368-9800

IS - 10

ER -