Utilising 360-degree feedback in the public sector: A case study of the Korean central government

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6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The 360-degree feedback involves all aspects of a group: managers, colleagues, subordinates, and customers. Recently, the Korean Civil Service Commission (CSC) supports the use of multiple raters as an effective method of assessing performance, both for developmental and appraisal needs. The 360-degree feedback was officially adopted for employee promotion in the Korean central government in 1998. However, there are direct costs in designing 360-degree feedback instruments and in training sessions for implementation, as well as human costs that include confusion and fear about 360-degree feedback. Like many organisational change efforts, cultures and habits are slow to change. Autocratic managers can be reluctant to change the rules in any fashion that could pose a threat to their positions of power.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)95-108
Number of pages14
JournalInternational Journal of Phytoremediation
Volume9
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2001 Dec

Fingerprint

public sector
managers
case studies
civil service
Feedback
organizational change
fearfulness
economic valuation
cost
human resources
Managers
Costs
Personnel
central government
methodology
method
need
appraisal

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Pollution
  • Plant Science

Cite this

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