Victimization and poly-victimization among school-aged Chinese adolescents

Prevalence and associations with health

Edward Ko Ling Chan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

58 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Given the limited number of systematic studies on child victimization in China, this study aimed to investigate the prevalence of child victimization and poly-victimization, and to examine the associations between victimization and negative health outcomes. Method: Using a 2-stage stratified sampling procedure, 18,341 adolescents aged 15 to 17. years old were recruited from 6 cities in China during 2009 and 2010. Adolescents completed a self-administered questionnaire containing items about child victimization and health outcomes (e.g. health-related quality of life, posttraumatic stress disorder [PTSD], depression, deliberate self-harm, and suicide ideation). Structured multiphase logistic regression analyses were conducted to examine the associations between these factors. Results: The lifetime prevalence of at least one form of victimization was 71%, whereas that of poly-victimization was 14%. Child victimization in the preceding year was associated with gender, age, number of siblings, and location of schools. Child victims were more likely to report PTSD and depressive symptoms, self-harm ideation, and poor physical and mental health. Conclusion: This study provided reliable estimates of the association between child victimization and health using a large and diverse sample in China. Based on the nature of the documented associations, several suggestions for public health professionals were offered.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)207-210
Number of pages4
JournalPreventive Medicine
Volume56
Issue number3-4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013 Mar 1

Fingerprint

Crime Victims
Health
China
Post-Traumatic Stress Disorders
Depression
Self-Injurious Behavior
Psychological Stress
Suicide
Siblings
Mental Health
Public Health
Logistic Models
Regression Analysis
Quality of Life

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Epidemiology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

@article{56ab38886ab3459b96973963fe1669c5,
title = "Victimization and poly-victimization among school-aged Chinese adolescents: Prevalence and associations with health",
abstract = "Objective: Given the limited number of systematic studies on child victimization in China, this study aimed to investigate the prevalence of child victimization and poly-victimization, and to examine the associations between victimization and negative health outcomes. Method: Using a 2-stage stratified sampling procedure, 18,341 adolescents aged 15 to 17. years old were recruited from 6 cities in China during 2009 and 2010. Adolescents completed a self-administered questionnaire containing items about child victimization and health outcomes (e.g. health-related quality of life, posttraumatic stress disorder [PTSD], depression, deliberate self-harm, and suicide ideation). Structured multiphase logistic regression analyses were conducted to examine the associations between these factors. Results: The lifetime prevalence of at least one form of victimization was 71{\%}, whereas that of poly-victimization was 14{\%}. Child victimization in the preceding year was associated with gender, age, number of siblings, and location of schools. Child victims were more likely to report PTSD and depressive symptoms, self-harm ideation, and poor physical and mental health. Conclusion: This study provided reliable estimates of the association between child victimization and health using a large and diverse sample in China. Based on the nature of the documented associations, several suggestions for public health professionals were offered.",
author = "Chan, {Edward Ko Ling}",
year = "2013",
month = "3",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.ypmed.2012.12.018",
language = "English",
volume = "56",
pages = "207--210",
journal = "Preventive Medicine",
issn = "0091-7435",
publisher = "Academic Press Inc.",
number = "3-4",

}

Victimization and poly-victimization among school-aged Chinese adolescents : Prevalence and associations with health. / Chan, Edward Ko Ling.

In: Preventive Medicine, Vol. 56, No. 3-4, 01.03.2013, p. 207-210.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Victimization and poly-victimization among school-aged Chinese adolescents

T2 - Prevalence and associations with health

AU - Chan, Edward Ko Ling

PY - 2013/3/1

Y1 - 2013/3/1

N2 - Objective: Given the limited number of systematic studies on child victimization in China, this study aimed to investigate the prevalence of child victimization and poly-victimization, and to examine the associations between victimization and negative health outcomes. Method: Using a 2-stage stratified sampling procedure, 18,341 adolescents aged 15 to 17. years old were recruited from 6 cities in China during 2009 and 2010. Adolescents completed a self-administered questionnaire containing items about child victimization and health outcomes (e.g. health-related quality of life, posttraumatic stress disorder [PTSD], depression, deliberate self-harm, and suicide ideation). Structured multiphase logistic regression analyses were conducted to examine the associations between these factors. Results: The lifetime prevalence of at least one form of victimization was 71%, whereas that of poly-victimization was 14%. Child victimization in the preceding year was associated with gender, age, number of siblings, and location of schools. Child victims were more likely to report PTSD and depressive symptoms, self-harm ideation, and poor physical and mental health. Conclusion: This study provided reliable estimates of the association between child victimization and health using a large and diverse sample in China. Based on the nature of the documented associations, several suggestions for public health professionals were offered.

AB - Objective: Given the limited number of systematic studies on child victimization in China, this study aimed to investigate the prevalence of child victimization and poly-victimization, and to examine the associations between victimization and negative health outcomes. Method: Using a 2-stage stratified sampling procedure, 18,341 adolescents aged 15 to 17. years old were recruited from 6 cities in China during 2009 and 2010. Adolescents completed a self-administered questionnaire containing items about child victimization and health outcomes (e.g. health-related quality of life, posttraumatic stress disorder [PTSD], depression, deliberate self-harm, and suicide ideation). Structured multiphase logistic regression analyses were conducted to examine the associations between these factors. Results: The lifetime prevalence of at least one form of victimization was 71%, whereas that of poly-victimization was 14%. Child victimization in the preceding year was associated with gender, age, number of siblings, and location of schools. Child victims were more likely to report PTSD and depressive symptoms, self-harm ideation, and poor physical and mental health. Conclusion: This study provided reliable estimates of the association between child victimization and health using a large and diverse sample in China. Based on the nature of the documented associations, several suggestions for public health professionals were offered.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84874325723&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84874325723&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.ypmed.2012.12.018

DO - 10.1016/j.ypmed.2012.12.018

M3 - Article

VL - 56

SP - 207

EP - 210

JO - Preventive Medicine

JF - Preventive Medicine

SN - 0091-7435

IS - 3-4

ER -