Visceral fat accumulation determines postprandial lipemic response, lipid peroxidation, DNA damage, and endothelial dysfunction in nonobese Korean men

Yangsoo Jang, Oh Yoen Kim, Ha Jung Ryu, Ji Young Kim, Sang Hoon Song, Jose M. Ordovas, Jong Ho Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Visceral fat has been associated with multiple cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors. The aim of this study was to identify anthropometrical measures most closely associated with some well-known CVD risk factors. Because most Asians at risk have normal body mass index (BMI) according to Western standards, we studied healthy nonobese Korean males (n = 102; age: 36.5 ± 0.8 years, BMI: 23.8 ± 0.2 kg/m2). Visceral fat area (VFA) at the fourth lumbar vertebra was associated with increased postprandial triglyceride (TG) response (r = 0.53, P < 0.001) and with plasma malondialdehyde (MDA) (r = 0.36, P < 0.01) and PGF2α (r = 0.24, P < 0.05). When matched for BMI and age, men with high VFA (HVFA) (≥100 cm2; n = 27) had higher blood pressure (P < 0.01), increased consumption of cigarettes (P < 0.01), and lower ratio of energy expenditure to calorie intake (P < 0.01) as compared with low VFA men (<100 cm2; n = 27). Men with HVFA showed higher TG, glucose, and insulin responses following fat and oral glucose tolerance tests respectively higher plasma concentrations of MDA (P < 0.001), urinary PGF (P < 0.05), and lymphocytes deoxyribonucleic acid tail moments (P < 0.01). Conversely, HVFA was associated with lower testosterone, insulin-like growth factor-1, and brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (P < 0.001). In conclusion, our data indicate that visceral fat accumulation, even in nonobese men, is a major factor contributing to increased CVD risk.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2356-2364
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Lipid Research
Volume44
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2003 Dec 1

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Intra-Abdominal Fat
Lipid Peroxidation
DNA Damage
Fats
Lipids
DNA
Body Mass Index
Dinoprost
Cardiovascular Diseases
Malondialdehyde
Triglycerides
Lumbar Vertebrae
Brachial Artery
Plasmas
Glucose
Somatomedins
Glucose Tolerance Test
Lymphocytes
Tobacco Products
Energy Metabolism

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry
  • Endocrinology
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

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title = "Visceral fat accumulation determines postprandial lipemic response, lipid peroxidation, DNA damage, and endothelial dysfunction in nonobese Korean men",
abstract = "Visceral fat has been associated with multiple cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors. The aim of this study was to identify anthropometrical measures most closely associated with some well-known CVD risk factors. Because most Asians at risk have normal body mass index (BMI) according to Western standards, we studied healthy nonobese Korean males (n = 102; age: 36.5 ± 0.8 years, BMI: 23.8 ± 0.2 kg/m2). Visceral fat area (VFA) at the fourth lumbar vertebra was associated with increased postprandial triglyceride (TG) response (r = 0.53, P < 0.001) and with plasma malondialdehyde (MDA) (r = 0.36, P < 0.01) and PGF2α (r = 0.24, P < 0.05). When matched for BMI and age, men with high VFA (HVFA) (≥100 cm2; n = 27) had higher blood pressure (P < 0.01), increased consumption of cigarettes (P < 0.01), and lower ratio of energy expenditure to calorie intake (P < 0.01) as compared with low VFA men (<100 cm2; n = 27). Men with HVFA showed higher TG, glucose, and insulin responses following fat and oral glucose tolerance tests respectively higher plasma concentrations of MDA (P < 0.001), urinary PGF2α (P < 0.05), and lymphocytes deoxyribonucleic acid tail moments (P < 0.01). Conversely, HVFA was associated with lower testosterone, insulin-like growth factor-1, and brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (P < 0.001). In conclusion, our data indicate that visceral fat accumulation, even in nonobese men, is a major factor contributing to increased CVD risk.",
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Visceral fat accumulation determines postprandial lipemic response, lipid peroxidation, DNA damage, and endothelial dysfunction in nonobese Korean men. / Jang, Yangsoo; Kim, Oh Yoen; Ryu, Ha Jung; Kim, Ji Young; Song, Sang Hoon; Ordovas, Jose M.; Lee, Jong Ho.

In: Journal of Lipid Research, Vol. 44, No. 12, 01.12.2003, p. 2356-2364.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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N2 - Visceral fat has been associated with multiple cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors. The aim of this study was to identify anthropometrical measures most closely associated with some well-known CVD risk factors. Because most Asians at risk have normal body mass index (BMI) according to Western standards, we studied healthy nonobese Korean males (n = 102; age: 36.5 ± 0.8 years, BMI: 23.8 ± 0.2 kg/m2). Visceral fat area (VFA) at the fourth lumbar vertebra was associated with increased postprandial triglyceride (TG) response (r = 0.53, P < 0.001) and with plasma malondialdehyde (MDA) (r = 0.36, P < 0.01) and PGF2α (r = 0.24, P < 0.05). When matched for BMI and age, men with high VFA (HVFA) (≥100 cm2; n = 27) had higher blood pressure (P < 0.01), increased consumption of cigarettes (P < 0.01), and lower ratio of energy expenditure to calorie intake (P < 0.01) as compared with low VFA men (<100 cm2; n = 27). Men with HVFA showed higher TG, glucose, and insulin responses following fat and oral glucose tolerance tests respectively higher plasma concentrations of MDA (P < 0.001), urinary PGF2α (P < 0.05), and lymphocytes deoxyribonucleic acid tail moments (P < 0.01). Conversely, HVFA was associated with lower testosterone, insulin-like growth factor-1, and brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (P < 0.001). In conclusion, our data indicate that visceral fat accumulation, even in nonobese men, is a major factor contributing to increased CVD risk.

AB - Visceral fat has been associated with multiple cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors. The aim of this study was to identify anthropometrical measures most closely associated with some well-known CVD risk factors. Because most Asians at risk have normal body mass index (BMI) according to Western standards, we studied healthy nonobese Korean males (n = 102; age: 36.5 ± 0.8 years, BMI: 23.8 ± 0.2 kg/m2). Visceral fat area (VFA) at the fourth lumbar vertebra was associated with increased postprandial triglyceride (TG) response (r = 0.53, P < 0.001) and with plasma malondialdehyde (MDA) (r = 0.36, P < 0.01) and PGF2α (r = 0.24, P < 0.05). When matched for BMI and age, men with high VFA (HVFA) (≥100 cm2; n = 27) had higher blood pressure (P < 0.01), increased consumption of cigarettes (P < 0.01), and lower ratio of energy expenditure to calorie intake (P < 0.01) as compared with low VFA men (<100 cm2; n = 27). Men with HVFA showed higher TG, glucose, and insulin responses following fat and oral glucose tolerance tests respectively higher plasma concentrations of MDA (P < 0.001), urinary PGF2α (P < 0.05), and lymphocytes deoxyribonucleic acid tail moments (P < 0.01). Conversely, HVFA was associated with lower testosterone, insulin-like growth factor-1, and brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (P < 0.001). In conclusion, our data indicate that visceral fat accumulation, even in nonobese men, is a major factor contributing to increased CVD risk.

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