What amount of metallic impurities in carbon nanotubes is small enough not to dominate their redox properties?

Martin Pumera, Yuji Miyahara

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

115 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

As carbon nanotubes become a part of everyday life, the paramount questions about their toxicity persist. While it has been proven that a significant part of the toxicity of carbon nanotubes is due to the redox activity of the residual metallic impurities present within them, there is still no response to the fundamental question of where the borderline is that would render the impurities 'redox invisible'. Herein we investigate the electrochemical response of carbon nanotubes containing different amounts of impurities towards the reduction of an important biomarker, hydrogen peroxide, and the oxidation of an important impurity marker, hydrazine. We found that the borderline between being redox active/inactive for iron-based impurities lies in the middle-ppm range.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)260-265
Number of pages6
JournalNanoscale
Volume1
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009 Dec 1

Fingerprint

Carbon Nanotubes
Carbon nanotubes
Impurities
hydrazine
Toxicity
Hydrazine
Biomarkers
Hydrogen peroxide
Hydrogen Peroxide
Iron
Oxidation-Reduction
Oxidation

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Materials Science(all)

Cite this

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What amount of metallic impurities in carbon nanotubes is small enough not to dominate their redox properties? / Pumera, Martin; Miyahara, Yuji.

In: Nanoscale, Vol. 1, No. 2, 01.12.2009, p. 260-265.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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