What are the areas of competence for central and local governments? Accountability mechanisms in multi-level governance

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12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study aims to advance understanding of the distinctive areas of competence for central and local governments. In doing so, we focus on the relative impacts of two accountability mechanisms - elections and management approaches - on the bureaucratic attitudes and behaviors exhibited within central and local governments. We posit that elections have dominant impacts in local governments, whereas management systems play a relatively larger role in the central government. Due to this difference, the central government may be better placed than local governments to administer those public service activities that either have outputs unobservable to the citizenry or require a lead time that is longer than the time between elections. This study investigates this argument empirically by taking advantage of a unique quasi-experiment in South Korea in which responsibility for administration of local water supply services changed from local governments to a central government agency. Investigating 7 years' worth of quarterly data, we find that following the change in governance, citizen satisfaction deteriorated but efficiency improved.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)120-134
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Public Administration Research and Theory
Volume27
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017 Jan 1

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multi-level-governance
responsibility
election
government agency
Multi-level governance
Local government
Central government
Accountability
management
South Korea
water management
public service
governance
citizen
efficiency
Elections
experiment

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Public Administration
  • Marketing

Cite this

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