What gives? Cross-national differences in students' giving behavior

Chul Hee Kang, Femida Handy, Lesley Hustinx, Ram Cnaan, Jeffrey L. Brudney, Debbie Haski-Leventhal, Kirsten Holmes, Lucas Meijs, Anne Birgitta Pessi, Bhagyashree Ranade, Karen Smith, Naoto Yamauchi, Siniša Zrinščak

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study is targeted to understanding the giving of time and money among a specific cohort - university students across 13 countries. It explores predictors of different combinations of giving behaviors: only volunteering, only donating, neither, as compared to doing both. Among the predictors of these four types of giving behavior, we also account for cross-national differences across models of civil society. The findings show that students predominantly prefer to give money than to volunteer time. In addition, differences in civil society regimes provide insights into which type of giving behavior might dominate. As expected, in the Statist and Traditional models of civil society, students consistently were more likely to be disengaged in giving behaviors (neither volunteering nor giving money) in comparison to students in the Liberal model who were more likely to report doing 'both' giving behaviors. An important implication of our findings is that while individual characteristics and values influence giving of time and money, these factors are played out in the context of civil society regimes, whose effects cannot be ignored. Our analysis has made a start in a new area of inquiry attempting to explain different giving behaviors using micro and macro level factors and raises several implications for future research.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)283-294
Number of pages12
JournalSocial Science Journal
Volume48
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011 Jun 1

Fingerprint

Students
civil society
money
student
regime
Volunteers
macro level
micro level
university
time
Values

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Social Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

Kang, C. H., Handy, F., Hustinx, L., Cnaan, R., Brudney, J. L., Haski-Leventhal, D., ... Zrinščak, S. (2011). What gives? Cross-national differences in students' giving behavior. Social Science Journal, 48(2), 283-294. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.soscij.2010.12.006
Kang, Chul Hee ; Handy, Femida ; Hustinx, Lesley ; Cnaan, Ram ; Brudney, Jeffrey L. ; Haski-Leventhal, Debbie ; Holmes, Kirsten ; Meijs, Lucas ; Pessi, Anne Birgitta ; Ranade, Bhagyashree ; Smith, Karen ; Yamauchi, Naoto ; Zrinščak, Siniša. / What gives? Cross-national differences in students' giving behavior. In: Social Science Journal. 2011 ; Vol. 48, No. 2. pp. 283-294.
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Kang, CH, Handy, F, Hustinx, L, Cnaan, R, Brudney, JL, Haski-Leventhal, D, Holmes, K, Meijs, L, Pessi, AB, Ranade, B, Smith, K, Yamauchi, N & Zrinščak, S 2011, 'What gives? Cross-national differences in students' giving behavior', Social Science Journal, vol. 48, no. 2, pp. 283-294. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.soscij.2010.12.006

What gives? Cross-national differences in students' giving behavior. / Kang, Chul Hee; Handy, Femida; Hustinx, Lesley; Cnaan, Ram; Brudney, Jeffrey L.; Haski-Leventhal, Debbie; Holmes, Kirsten; Meijs, Lucas; Pessi, Anne Birgitta; Ranade, Bhagyashree; Smith, Karen; Yamauchi, Naoto; Zrinščak, Siniša.

In: Social Science Journal, Vol. 48, No. 2, 01.06.2011, p. 283-294.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Holmes, Kirsten

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AU - Yamauchi, Naoto

AU - Zrinščak, Siniša

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Kang CH, Handy F, Hustinx L, Cnaan R, Brudney JL, Haski-Leventhal D et al. What gives? Cross-national differences in students' giving behavior. Social Science Journal. 2011 Jun 1;48(2):283-294. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.soscij.2010.12.006