Why are teachers afraid of curricular autonomy? Contradictory effects of the new national curriculum in South Korea

Won Pyo Hong, Peter Youngs

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Using interview data from secondary teachers, this study examines conflicting perspectives on the effects of the new national curriculum in South Korea, which was intended to grant more autonomy to individual schools and teachers. Contrary to the general belief that teachers want more autonomy to customize their curricula to meet students' needs, this study found that the participating teachers did not welcome the enhanced curricular autonomy nor did they believe it would diversify the school curriculum. The primary causes of this contradiction are the gap between the desired and the granted autonomy, the new national curriculum's negative impact on the relationships among teachers and their job security, and the prevalent credential culture in South Korea. Based on these findings, this study suggests wider implications for curriculum scholars and policymakers in other contexts concerning the nature and effects of teacher autonomy in curriculum development.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)20-33
Number of pages14
JournalAsia Pacific Journal of Education
Volume36
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016 Jan 15

Fingerprint

South Korea
autonomy
curriculum
teacher
job security
curriculum development
school
cause
interview
student

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education

Cite this

@article{5050f3dbbdcc41a0b18baef6d5147b5f,
title = "Why are teachers afraid of curricular autonomy? Contradictory effects of the new national curriculum in South Korea",
abstract = "Using interview data from secondary teachers, this study examines conflicting perspectives on the effects of the new national curriculum in South Korea, which was intended to grant more autonomy to individual schools and teachers. Contrary to the general belief that teachers want more autonomy to customize their curricula to meet students' needs, this study found that the participating teachers did not welcome the enhanced curricular autonomy nor did they believe it would diversify the school curriculum. The primary causes of this contradiction are the gap between the desired and the granted autonomy, the new national curriculum's negative impact on the relationships among teachers and their job security, and the prevalent credential culture in South Korea. Based on these findings, this study suggests wider implications for curriculum scholars and policymakers in other contexts concerning the nature and effects of teacher autonomy in curriculum development.",
author = "Hong, {Won Pyo} and Peter Youngs",
year = "2016",
month = "1",
day = "15",
doi = "10.1080/02188791.2014.959471",
language = "English",
volume = "36",
pages = "20--33",
journal = "Asia Pacific Journal of Education",
issn = "0218-8791",
publisher = "Routledge",

}

Why are teachers afraid of curricular autonomy? Contradictory effects of the new national curriculum in South Korea. / Hong, Won Pyo; Youngs, Peter.

In: Asia Pacific Journal of Education, Vol. 36, 15.01.2016, p. 20-33.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Why are teachers afraid of curricular autonomy? Contradictory effects of the new national curriculum in South Korea

AU - Hong, Won Pyo

AU - Youngs, Peter

PY - 2016/1/15

Y1 - 2016/1/15

N2 - Using interview data from secondary teachers, this study examines conflicting perspectives on the effects of the new national curriculum in South Korea, which was intended to grant more autonomy to individual schools and teachers. Contrary to the general belief that teachers want more autonomy to customize their curricula to meet students' needs, this study found that the participating teachers did not welcome the enhanced curricular autonomy nor did they believe it would diversify the school curriculum. The primary causes of this contradiction are the gap between the desired and the granted autonomy, the new national curriculum's negative impact on the relationships among teachers and their job security, and the prevalent credential culture in South Korea. Based on these findings, this study suggests wider implications for curriculum scholars and policymakers in other contexts concerning the nature and effects of teacher autonomy in curriculum development.

AB - Using interview data from secondary teachers, this study examines conflicting perspectives on the effects of the new national curriculum in South Korea, which was intended to grant more autonomy to individual schools and teachers. Contrary to the general belief that teachers want more autonomy to customize their curricula to meet students' needs, this study found that the participating teachers did not welcome the enhanced curricular autonomy nor did they believe it would diversify the school curriculum. The primary causes of this contradiction are the gap between the desired and the granted autonomy, the new national curriculum's negative impact on the relationships among teachers and their job security, and the prevalent credential culture in South Korea. Based on these findings, this study suggests wider implications for curriculum scholars and policymakers in other contexts concerning the nature and effects of teacher autonomy in curriculum development.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84907284408&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84907284408&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/02188791.2014.959471

DO - 10.1080/02188791.2014.959471

M3 - Article

VL - 36

SP - 20

EP - 33

JO - Asia Pacific Journal of Education

JF - Asia Pacific Journal of Education

SN - 0218-8791

ER -